8th Africa Day for Food and Nutrition Security 30.10.2017

8th Africa Day for Food and Nutrition Security

The theme for this year's celebration is “Advancing Sustainable Food Systems for Healthy Diets and Improved Nutrition – Key for Harnessing Africa’s Demographic Dividend”


The Africa Day for Food and Nutrition Security (ADFNS) was declared in July 2010 by the African Union Heads of State and Government at the 15th Ordinary Session of the AU Summit in Kampala, Uganda and has so far been successfully commemorated in seven times following its launch in Lilongwe, Malawi, on 31st October 2010. This year’s Commemoration of the 8th Africa Day for Food and Nutrition Security with Continental Symposium on Food Systems will be on 18 November 2017 in Abidjan, Ivory Coast.


Cashews are known to be among the most nutritious and healthiest however the less popular cashew apple is also loaded with vitamins and minerals. Although not a staple, cashew (both fruit and nut) can be intergrated into African menu to improve nutrition. (Nutritious & Delicious Cashew Dishes - 13 Everyday Recipes)


Some health benefits of cashew include:



  • They contain less fat than most snack nuts, including groundnuts, almonds and pecans. The fats in cashew are heart-healthy monounsaturated fat.

  • Cashew nuts are high in copper which promotes several physiological processes such as iron utilization and the elimination of free radicals, development of bone and connective tissue, the production of the skin and hair pigment melanin as well as vitamin E which prevent skin aging and tissue damage.

  • Cashew apples are an excellent source of Vitamin A, B and C, high in antioxidants and minerals.


Read more on Health benefits of cashew nuts and apples.



The Third Session of the 4th Edition of the Master Training Program for Cashew Value Chain Promotion Kicks Off in Abidjan 24.10.2017

The Third Session of the 4th Edition of the Master Training Program for Cashew Value Chain Promotion Kicks Off in Abidjan


The third session of the fourth edition of the Master Training Program for cashew value chain promotion in Africa has opened in Abidjan the economic capital of the Ivory Coast. The third session being the final of the fourth edition, will see some 70 participants from 12 countries being certified as experts in cashew value chain promotion. 


The Master Training Program is an initiative of the Competitive Cashew initiative (ComCashew) in partnership with the African Cashew Alliance (ACA) and is supported by other public and private partners. 


Read More


Opening of the Third Session of the Fourth Edition of the Master Trainer Training Program


68 African experts in training to meet the challenges of transformation


68 experts africains en formation pour relever les défis de la transformation


 



Setting the future for the cashew sector in ACP countries 03.10.2017

Setting the future for the cashew sector in ACP countries


The ACP Group reaffirmed its commitment to developing cashew as a key commodity for several member states, at the 11th African Cashew Alliance (ACA) Annual Cashew Conference held in Cotonou, Benin from 18th to 21st September. The Conference, held under the theme: “A new vision for partnerships and Investments”, was officially opened by the Benin Minister of State, H.E. Abdoulaye Bio TCHANE, and was attended by over 400 stakeholders from 28 countries, including producers, processors, traders, exporters, government institutions, equipment manufacturers and service providers.


Read more: Setting the future for the cashew sector in ACP countries



First Ministerial Meeting of CICC held in Abidjan 03.10.2017

First Ministerial Meeting of CICC held in Abidjan


Nine African cashew producers, forming the founding countries for Consultative International Cashew Council - CICC, met for the first time on Friday (29 September) in Abidjan, Côte d'ivoire. The meeting was preceeded by a ministerial expert concertation on 28.09, where representatives of the concerned ministries examined the founding documents.


Born on November 17, 2016, The CICC brings together Benin, Burkina Faso, Côte d'Ivoire, Guinea Bissau, Guinea, Ghana, Mali, Togo and Senegal and represents the first international organisation for cashew producing countries in the world.


Read More:


First meeting of the organization of countries producing cashews


International Advisory Council on Cashew: Experts analyze projects before the first session of the Council of Ministers


African countries producing cashews organize themselves to conquer the market


Development of the cashew nut industry: Guinea signs the Convention on the International Cashew Advisory Council in Abidjan


Développement de la filière cajou



Un Colloque international d’Echanges scientifiques sur l’Anacarde s’ouvre à Grand Bassam 29.09.2017

Un Colloque international d’Echanges scientifiques sur l’Anacarde s’ouvre à Grand Bassam


Un colloque dédié à la promotion de l’intensification agro-écologique de la production et de la transformation du cajou en Afrique a commencé ce mardi 26 septembre 2017 à Grand Bassam. Le Colloque International d’Echanges Scientifiques sur l’Anacarde (CIESA) sert de plateforme pour les scientifiques et experts de l’anacarde venant de 18 pays de l’Afrique, de l’Asie et de l’Europe de partager des résultats des programmes et projets de recherche sur l’anacardier en Afrique de l’Ouest et du Centre.


lire plus ici


Un Colloque international d’Echanges scientifiques sur l’Anacarde s’ouvre à Grand Bassam



International Scientific Colloquium on Cashew (CIESA) 2017 25.09.2017

International Scientific Colloquium on Cashew (CIESA) 2017

CIESA is scheduled to take place from 26 to 28 September 2017 in Abidjan (Côte d’Ivoire)


The Cotton and Cashew Council  (CCA) in collaboration with the International Consultative Council of Cashew (CICC) and the Research and Development Network on Cashew in Africa (REDAA), with technical and financial support from CORAF, PSAC and ComCashew, is organizing the International Scientific Colloquium on Cashew (CIESA 2017) on 26-28 September 2017 at the AFRIKLAND Hotel in Grand Bassam on the theme: "Agro-ecological intensification of production and transformation of cashew in Africa: Issues - Acquis Scientifiques et Technologiques - Perspectives"


Read more


Communiqué relatif au colloque international d’échanges scientifiques sur l’anacarde (CIESA 2017)


Colloque scientifique international sur l’anacarde


Download the programme:


Topics for panel discussion


Terms of Reference(English)


Terms of Reference (French)


Programme flyer (front)


Programme flyer (back)


 


 



Time for Ghana to cash in on cashew 25.08.2017

Time for Ghana to cash in on cashew


Available statistics indicate that cashew is easily the most prospective, if not already the leading non-traditional export revenue earner in the country.


There is therefore the need for the executive and all stakeholders to work together to promote the growth of Ghana’s fledgling local cashew industry.


Undoubtedly, the cashew value chain brings a wide range of opportunities from production, through processing to the export of raw nuts.


Read More:


Time for Ghana to cash in on cashew



Ghana cashew industry at the crossroads 23.08.2017

Ghana cashew industry at the crossroads


In the country’s quest to diversify and improve its commodity export bill, cashew has come to be identified as the produce with the strongest potential of ploughing in as much foreign revenue as cocoa has done for many years. The aspiration among key players in the cashew sub-sector of making Ghana the hub of Cashew production in West Africa is an indication that cashew cultivation has eventually evolved into a strategic economic sub-sector now meriting far more attention and care than it has received in the past.


Read more


Ghana cashew industry at the crossroads



Who wants to be a cashew farmer in Ghana? 17.08.2017

Who wants to be a cashew farmer in Ghana?

Since the early 1960s when cashew cultivation began in Ghana it has steadily, albeit slowly, blossomed into a significant economic tree crop with a high potential of leading the non-traditional export category in foreign revenue generation.


The steady growth of the cashew sub-sector may be largely attributed to the relative stability and the conducive business environment in the country and the concerted action of private sector players; Non Governmental Organisations (NGOs) and some state agencies to ensure a vibrant cashew sub-sector.


Read more:


Who wants to be a cashew farmer in Ghana?



Governance and upgrading in South–South value chains: evidence from the cashew industries in India and Ivory Coast 17.08.2017

Governance and upgrading in South–South value chains: evidence from the cashew industries in India and Ivory Coast


India, the world’s largest processor of cashew kernels, depends heavily on imports of raw cashew nuts (RCNs), primarily sourced from Ivory Coast. While the Ivorian processing industry is still in its infancy, in the last decade domestic cashew factories have rapidly increased their capacity. This study is an exploration of how the cashew value chain is organized and what this implies for upgrading prospects in the Ivorian cashew sector. Its findings suggest that the cashew value chain is characterized by a bipolar governance structure comprising a trader-driven segment between Ivorian farms and Indian processors, and a buyer-driven segment that links processors to Northern end markets.


Read More


Governance and upgrading in South–South value chains: evidence from the cashew industries in India and Ivory Coast



Cashew data collectors recommend improvements to ACA’s market information service 15.08.2017

Cashew data collectors recommend improvements to ACA’s market information service


An African Cashew Alliance (ACA) workshop in early August gathered information from market analysts and data collectors from nine ACA member countries to guide improvements and boost use of its Market Information System (MIS). The August 1-3 workshop in Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso—organized by the African Cashew Alliance with Trade Hub support — informed a draft action plan to increase service uptake for this subscription-based service, which has been online since 2012.


Read more:


Cashew data collectors recommend improvements to ACA’s market information service



Master Training Program to promote African Cashew comes off at Sunyani 10.08.2017

Master Training Program to promote African Cashew comes off at Sunyani

The second session of the fourth edition is currently underway at the Eusbett Hotel at Sunyani in the Brong Ahafo Region


The program which has been put together by the Competitive Cashew initiative (ComCashew) in collaboration with the African Cashew Alliance (ACA), with support from the Ministry of Food and Agriculture (MoFA) and the Cocoa Research Institute Ghana (CRIG), started from August 7 and scheduled to end on August 11, 2017.


The aim of this unique Master Training Program, is to increase theoretical knowledge and practical skills of African cashew experts along the value chain and thus to further promote the competitiveness of African cashew.


Read more:


Master Training Program to promote African Cashew comes off at Sunyani


Gov't Lauded For Including Cashew To Planting For Food & Jobs Program


ComCashew holds training program in cashew value chain promotion


ComCashew creates over 46,500 jobs in Ghana


 


 



A Master Training Program to promote the African Cashew Value Chain: The 4th edition (Session 2) 04.08.2017

A Master Training Program to promote the African Cashew Value Chain: The 4th edition (Session 2)

Cashew experts from 12 African countries to participate in the second session of the fourth edition of the Master Training Program (MTP)


The Competitive Cashew initiative (ComCashew) together with the African Cashew Alliance(ACA), with support from the Ministry of Food and Agriculture (MoFA) and the Cocoa Research Institute Ghana (CRIG), will hold the 2nd session of the 4th edition of the Master Training Program for Cashew Value Chain Promotion from Monday, 7h to Friday, 11th August 2017 at the Eusbett Hotel, Sunyani Brong Ahafo Region.


This second session in Sunyani will mainly focus on Improved Planting Material development, establishment of new plantations and design of adult training programme among others. Participants will be introduced to Monitoring and Evaluation and Gender and Cashew value chain promotion. At each session, there is a combination of topics on self-reflection and perception management and on behaviors and values that affect learning and teaching skills. The highlight of this session will be a field visit to the Cocoa Research Institute of Ghana (CRIG) research station and farm visits in the cashew production areas around Sunyani.


 The Cashew Master Training Programme is an important "next step" in the concerted collaborative efforts and work done by the Ministry of Food and Agriculture, the Ministry of Trade and Industry, the Cocoa Research Institute, ComCashew and the African Cashew Alliance to improve the Cashew sector in Ghana.” – Hon. Archibald Yao Letsa, Volta regional minister.


In the words of Mr. Ernest Mintah Acting MD of the African Cashew Alliance (ACA), “…Investing in the cashew business is a necessity, but knowledge to run your business is vital. Master trainers have, since the inception of this programme, become the compass that will take cashew business to a globally competitive level…”


 


Seven months. Three sessions. Three locations.


Rolled out in seven months, the Master Training Program is divided in three successive sessions to be held in Ghana and Côte d'Ivoire. In so called “inter-sessions”, the participants return to their host institutions to conduct field work, either individually or in groups, to deepen knowledge on a selected topic. After completion of the program, the participants become acknowledged cashew experts. They either train farmers, provide assistance to processors, or advice institutions in their home countries. At the heart of the Master Training Program are facilitators and technical experts who teach, evaluate and potentially re-design each training session according to participants’ needs. The training contents are developed with great support and commitment from various ComCashew partners.  They use stimulating presentations, interactive role plays and lively discussions to deliver trainings. 


 


The Competitive Cashew initiative (ComCashew)


The Competitive Cashew initiative (ComCashew) constitutes a new type of multi‐stakeholder partnership in development cooperation. Since its inception in 2009, around 440,000 new jobs have been created in Benin, Burkina Faso, Côte d'Ivoire, Ghana and Mozambique – 75 per cent in production, 20 per cent in trade and 5 per cent in processing. In Ghana, the initiative has trained more than 40,000 farmers and has created over 46,500 jobs in production and processing. In the area of processing, the project has given technical support and assistance to 7 processors. The Deutsche Gesellschaft für Internationale Zusammenarbeit GIZ (GmbH) has been commissioned by the German Federal Ministry for Economic Cooperation and Development (BMZ) with the management of the project. ComCashew benefits from the diverse commercial and technical expertise of their private and public-sector partners. Key cooperation partners in Ghana are the Ministry of Food and Agriculture (MOFA) and the Cocoa Research Institute of Ghana (CRIG). 


 


For more information, please contact:


Cynthia Benon, Manager of the Master Training Program, al-da.benon@giz.de or


Sylvia Pobee, Communication Manager, sylvia.pobee@giz.de


For more information on ComCashew, please visit our website www.comcashew.org          



MMDCEs in Ghana Schooled on New Agric Project 'Planting For Investment' 27.07.2017

MMDCEs in Ghana Schooled on New Agric Project 'Planting For Investment'


District and Municipal Chief Executives as well as all directors of Ministry of Food and Agriculture (MOFA) in the Brong -Ahafo Region have been sensitised on a new agriculture programme which government will soon launch to ensure food security and raw materials for industries. 


The programme, which will pay special attention to selected cash crops namely Cashew, Shea, Mango, Citrus, Cocoa, Rubber and Oil Palm, will be launched jointly by the Ministries of Food and Agriculture and the Local Government and Rural Development.


Read more


MMDCEs in Ghana Schooled on New Agric Project 'Planting For Investment'



The 11th edition of the annual ACA Cashew Conference launched in Abidjan 05.07.2017

The 11th edition of the annual ACA Cashew Conference launched in Abidjan


The 11th Annual Cashew Conference organized by the African Cashew Alliance (ACA), scheduled to take place from 18 to 21 September 2017 in Cotonou, has officially been launched in Abidjan. 

The Conference, to be organized in collaboration with the Benin Value Chain Association and the Government of Benin, aims to serve as a platform to encourage strategic partnerships, Investment, sharing experiences and doing business.


Read more:


The 11th edition of the annual Cajou Conference scheduled for September in Cotonou, launched in Abidjan



Cashew Initiative – a role model for development in Africa 29.06.2017

Cashew Initiative – a role model for development in Africa

More than 430,000 farmers are benefiting from higher incomes and yields. Around 22,000 new jobs in cashew processing have also been created.


On 7 and 8 July 2017, the world's eyes will be on Hamburg, when the heads of state and government of the 19 major industrialised and emerging nations and the EU meet for the G20 Summit. One of the central topics at this meeting will be Africa and how to secure sustainable economic development on the African continent. The Competitive Cashew Initiative offers a prime example of how to achieve this.


Read more: Cashew Initiative – a role model for development in Africa



ComCashew News Bulletin - Edition 8 19.06.2017

ComCashew News Bulletin - Edition 8

The 8th edition of the ComCashew News Bulletin is dedicated to Sector Organisation and the 2017 cashew harvest season


This edition highlights the activities of ComCashew and its partners in sector organisation in its project countries as well as other African cashew-producing countries. Information on the cashew harvest season in our project countries and the state of the cashew market this year are also provided. Enjoy reading the bulletin! 


Cashew Harvest Season and Sector Organisation


 


Cashew Market Update - May 2017



Le Bulletin d'Information de ComCashew - 8ème édition 19.06.2017

Le Bulletin d'Information de ComCashew - 8ème édition

La 8eme édition du bulletin de ComCashew est dédié à l’organisation du secteur et la saison de la récolte.


Cette édition met l’accent sur les activités de ComCashew et ses partenaires en l’organisation du secteur dans les pays d’intervention du projet et aussi dans d’autres pays producteurs africains. Les informations sur la saison de la récolte dans nos pays d’interventions et la situation du marché cette année sont aussi données. Bonne lecture du bulletin !


La saison de la récolte et l’organisation du secteur anacarde


Rapport sur le marché de la noix de cajou- Mai 2017



Cashew earns $196m for Ghana in 2016 09.06.2017

Cashew earns $196m for Ghana in 2016


Cashew has over the years become the leading non-traditional export earner in Ghana’s agriculture sub-sector, contributing $196.7 million in 2016, according to the Ghana Export Promotion Authority (GEPA).


GEPA is, meanwhile, proposing a surcharge on raw cashew exports to encourage more local processing of the nuts. Chief Executive Officer of GEPA, Ms Gifty Klenam, said in an interview that the move was to ensure local processors get raw cashew for grinding and value-addition so as to increase the earnings Ghana gets on the world market instead of exporting the commodity in the raw form. 


Read more:


Cashew earns $196m for Ghana in 2016



ComCashew @ EDD 2017 08.06.2017

ComCashew @ EDD 2017


The 2017 edition of the European Development Days – EDD17, opened in Brussels on June 7, 2017. The two-day event will June 8, 2017.Organised by the European Commission, the European Development Days (EDD) bring the development community together each year to share ideas and experiences in ways that inspire new partnerships and innovative solutions to the world’s most pressing challenges The European Development Days is Europe's leading forum on international cooperation and development. EDD 2017 will promote a new global strategy to address the most pressing current global development challenges and bring together development actors committed to tackling poverty worldwide, with a particular emphasis on engaging the private sector as a partner in economic development.


The private sector's role in international development policies will be discussed and spotlighted throughout the forum. Overarching objectives of the private sector engagement include the promotion of inclusive growth and the creation of decent jobs in particular for women and youth, which lead to improved living conditions. EDD aims to help shape global policy, share knowledge and promote real innovation. This year’s event which is the 11th EDD is focusing on international community’s strategic response to the most pressing global challenges of the day, as part of the international effort to meet the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). The event brings together development actors committed to tackling poverty worldwide, with an emphasis on engaging the private sector as a key and responsible partner in economic development. Three (3) key themes are being discussed and debated in this year’s forum - Investing in Development - in order to find solutions to vital global strategic issues:



  • Investing in People and Planet (Gender Equality/Women Empowerment; Equality, Migration and Mobility, Sustainable energy and climate action)

  • Investing in Prosperity

  • Investing in Peace and Partnerships


The forum builds on the core belief that cooperation is crucial to achieve real change towards a poverty-free and sustainable world where everyone has the prospect for a decent life. An essential aim is thus to inspire the desire to work together in a spirit of true partnership through facilitating networking. It also aims to achieve inclusive and sustainable growth, creating decent jobs, particularly for women and young people through investment, in particular with the full engagement of the private sector both as an economic and responsible actor in development.


The Competitive Cashew initiative is represented by Mary Adzanyo and Maria Schmidt at EDD 2017. They are promoting cashew together with two other GIZ projects under the umbrella of GIZ namely the cocoa and moringa projects. The German Development Corporation would be present in over 20 panels. If you are at the EDD, visit GIZ’s booth at stand number 71 to interact with the moringa, cocoa and cashew teams to learn more about these value chains and how they contribute to income generation, business competitiveness, environmental protection, climate change mitigation, nutrition and health. The European Development Days showcase Europe’s commitment to building a sustainable and fairer world. Sixteen extraordinary Young Leaders have been selected for EDD 2017. Coming from across the globe, aged between 21 to 26, they were chosen for their expertise, innovation and commitment to international cooperation and sustainable development


Visit https://eudevdays.eu/about-EDD for more information on EDD 2017




GEPA Demands Cap On Cashew Export 07.06.2017

GEPA Demands Cap On Cashew Export


The Ghana Export Promotion Authority (GEPA) has asked the central government to place a cap on the volume of raw cashew that can be exported from Ghana.


Chief Executive Officer (CEO) of GEPA, Gifty Klenam made the call on Friday, 2nd June, this year, in Accra, saying it has become imperative for government to impose limitation.


Ms Klenam, speaking to the media at her office, said if government cannot place a cap on raw cashew export, then it should surcharge it as an alternative.


That, she said, was because about 90 percent of Ghana’s cashew were being exported raw by foreigners, particularly Indians, Vietnamese, Lebanese, among others, without leaving any significant quantity for local companies, who want to do value addition.


Read more


GEPA Demands Cap On Cashew Export


Cashew earns $196m for Ghana in 2016



Ghana becomes 7th member of the Consultative International Cashew Council (CICC) 06.06.2017

Ghana becomes 7th member of the Consultative International Cashew Council (CICC)


Ghana became the seventh Cashew producing African country to sign onto the Consultative International Cashew Council (CICC), an international organization with legal capacity and financial autonomy responsible for promoting the sustainable development of cashew in the world. 


The Ministry of Food and Agriculture (MoFA), represented by the deputy minister in-charge of perennial crops, Hon. William A. Quaitoo signed the convention to officially make Ghana a member of the international body. The signing ceremony held in Accra on Monday June 6, 2017, was witnessed by the Director General of the Cotton and Cashew Council (CCA)of Côte d'Ivoire Dr. Adama Coulibably and representatives from the Ministry of Local Government and Rural Development, Ministry of Trade and Industry, the Ghana Cashew Industry Association (CIAG), the African Cashew Alliance (ACA) and the Competitive Cashew initiative (ComCashew).  


The CICC aims to create a consultation framework and collaborations between member states for a sustainable cashew sector. Ghana has complemented the process for the establishment of the CICC and as a result hosted the first consultation meeting in Accra in April 2016. So far, six cashew producing countries in Africa have signed the convention, they are; Côte d'Ivoire, Benin, Burkina Faso, Guinea Bissau, Senegal and Togo. Ghana is the first Anglophone country to become a member state of the Consultative International Cashew Council.


Over the last decade, cashew has gradually emerged as an important part of Africa’s economy. Cashew production in Africa has grown impressively in the past years from 1.2 million tons in 2014 to 1.8 million tons in 2016. Also, the value addition segment has increased from 35,000 MT in 2006 to about 145,000 MT in 2016. The African cashew industry could benefit immensely by capturing the value of its raw nut production through increasing processing on the continent.


In West Africa, Ghana has a comparative advantage due to continuous investment in cashew research by the Ministry of Food and Agriculture and the Cocoa Research Institute of Ghana. This has resulted in high productivity and quality of the cashew crop.  Ghana has 14 installed raw cashew nut processing units, with a total capacity of 68,000 MT. However, only about 15,000 MT is currently being processed in 2 of the 14 processing units. Ghana’s new government has made their dedication to the promotion of agriculture evident from the start with a pledge to spread industrialization across the country, on the “one district, one factory” policy. The government is also putting in place a cashew board to govern and regulate the cashew sector as well as to develop favorable policies to leverage existing efforts and promote investments in the sector.


The Consultative International Cashew Council is an international organization, steered by the Ministries responsible for cashew in its Member States. The Council of Ministers, of which Ghana is now a member, meets annually as the decision-making body for the development of the cashew sector.  Thus Ghana can contribute to the harmonization of policies in the region and profit from the exchange in the technical bodies for private sector promotion, cashew research along the value chain and production.


Read more 


Ghana joins Consultative International Cashew Council


    


 



Today is World Environment Day 05.06.2017

Today is World Environment Day

a day when we turn our attention to cleaning up and preserving the earth


Every year on June 5 people around the world observe world environment day. The day is all about raising awareness about nature and the importance of protecting it.


Since its inception in 1972, people worldwide have organized events, from neighbourhood clean-ups, to action against wildlife crime, to replanting forests to observe the day.  This year’s host country Canada chose the theme connecting people to nature” and will be at the centre of celebrations around the planet.


As part of activities to celebrate the day, staff of GIZ/ComCashew in Accra is embarking on a tree planting exercise, as their own small way of protecting the environment for future generations.


Cashew and the Environment.


The cashew value chain is recognized as an environmentally sustainable one. The cashew tree is known to be very robust and able to withstand harsh, climatic conditions with low rainfalls and thus lower soil fertility. That said, research has established that Cashew as a tree crop will be suitable for the purposes of Climate Change Adaptation and Mitigation. The production systems of the crop are generally extensive and do not require a lot of inputs like Fertilizer and irrigation. Similarly, the crop is known to grow very well in marginal soils. Cashew production also promotes afforestation and soil conservation. Moreover, cashew producers are able to intercrop with other food crops, a practice  which enhances productivity and income diversity and maintains soil fertility.


Cashew trees are also good for beekeeping and therefore promote biodiversity. Research shows that where bees are integrated into cashew farms there is an increase in yield levels as a result of pollination.


Read more


A Tale of Cashews and Honey: Merging Cashew Orchards and Beekeeping in Benin for increased revenue


The Study of the Effects of Integrating Beekeeping into Cashew Farms in Ghana and Benin


 


Plant a cashew tree today; you will be doing the environment a world of good!



GEPA and partners sign MOU on National Cashew Development Plan 26.05.2017

GEPA and partners sign MOU on National Cashew Development Plan

In a bid to increase the production and processing of RCN in Ghana, the Ghana Export Promotion Authority (GEPA) has signed a Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) with the Cashew Industry Association of Ghana (CIAG) and BLC Consult.


This step comes as part of the facilitation process for a 10-year National Cashew Development Plan (2017-2027) which has been drawn by key stakeholders to regulate the Ghanaian cashew sector.


To read more: GEPA and partners sign MOU on National Cashew Development Plan


Ghana: New Deal Sets 200,000Mt Cashew Production Target


 


 



Trilateral Cooperation towards Cashew Research and Cashew By-Product Processing: Ghana, Brazil and Germany collaborate for cashew sector development 24.05.2017

Trilateral Cooperation towards Cashew Research and Cashew By-Product Processing: Ghana, Brazil and Germany collaborate for cashew sector development


On Tuesday, May 16, 2017, a Trilateral Cooperation Project between Ghana, Brazil and Germany was launched to accelerate and revolutionize Cashew Research Activities and to increase Cashew By-Product Processing in Ghana.


The Trilateral Cooperation which will see the investment of €700,000 euros in the cashew sector is an initiative of the Government of Ghana through the Ministry of Food and Agriculture (MOFA) and the Ministry of Trade and Industry (MOTI), the Government of Brazil through the Brazilian Cooperation Agency (ABC) and the Government of Germany through the Federal Ministry for Economic Cooperation and Development (BMZ) to strengthen cross-regional technical cooperation.


The objective of the cooperation is to complement technical contributions and to apply specific knowledge, skills and experience of the three countries. The implementing institutions are the Ministry of Food and Agriculture (MoFA), the Brazilian Agricultural Research Cooperation (Embrapa) and the Deutsche Gesellschaft für Internationale Zusammenarbeit (GIZ) GmbH through the Competitive Cashew initiative. Partners to this cooperation, so far, include the Cocoa Research Institute of Ghana as well as the African Cashew Alliance (ACA).


The project aims at accelerating research on high quality cashew varieties that are tolerant to major diseases and pests and well adapted to local conditions. The second focus of the project is to promote cashew shell and apple processing technologies and marketing to increase the competitiveness of the value addition segment in the cashew value chain.


The Launch of the Trilateral Cooperation was followed by a field trip to the Wenchi Agricultural Research Station, the Cocoa Research Institute of Ghana, private nursery operator Tree Global as well as USIBRAS, the largest cashew processing factory in West Africa to examine and understand the status quo of cashew research and processing in Ghana.


Discoveries from the field trip and technical inputs from Ghanaian partners shaped the foundation for a two-day Internal Planning Workshop that defined the expected outcomes of the project, planned activities and the set standard for communication, coordination and transparency among partners as well as to monitor and evaluate project activities.


implementation of planned activities is scheduled to commence in August 2017.


Africa: ACA Contributes to improve Cashew Planting Material and By-Product Processing Technology following the Launch of a Trilateral Cooperation


 


 



The 36th Edition of the World Nut and Dried Fruit Congress held in India 24.05.2017

The 36th Edition of the World Nut and Dried Fruit Congress held in India


The International Nut and Dried Fruit Council (INC) celebrated the 36th Edition of the World Nut and Dried Fruit Congress for the first time in India from May 19 to 21 at the ITC Grand Chola in Chennai. The INC Congress witnessed the largest international gathering of food professionals, suppliers, traders and buyers from the nut and dried fruit business with nearly 1,000 attendees from across 60 countries.


The three-day conference was a global platform to exchange knowledge and ideas in market development, supply chain, consumption, product innovation, food safety, nutrition and research through a variety of monographic round tables, seminars, working group meetings, stand-alone sessions and keynote speakers.


A rountable on cashew was chaired by Hari  Nair. ComCashew was represented at the event by our director for private sector development, Madam Mary Adzanyo. 


Read more:


The 36th Edition of the World Nut and Dried Fruit Congress 


 



ComCashew Partners CCA and PSAC in KOR kit distribution 15.05.2017

ComCashew Partners CCA and PSAC in KOR kit distribution


As part of the implementation of the cashew nut quality platform activities in Cote d’Ivoire, the Cotton and Cashew Council (CCA), organized a training workshop for Farmer Based Organizations (FBOs). The training which took place in Grand Bassam was to provide the FBOs with the necessary knowledge and equipment to perform cashew quality test and analysis. 


A total of 60 KOR Kits acquired with the support of ComCashew and PSAC were awarded to the best 60 cashew FBOs in order to enable them to analyze the quality of their products at farm gate level.


The Director General of the Cotton abd Cashew Council in Cote d’Ivoire who spearheaded the kits distribution ceremony used the occassion to thank ComCashew and the other technical and financial partners, in particular the PSAC, for their continuous support that is aimed at preserving and promoting the quality of cashew nuts from Cote d’Ivoire.


 



Ghana Among 12 Countries Making Strides In Cashew Production 10.05.2017

Ghana Among 12 Countries Making Strides In Cashew Production

Ghana is making strides in the research and production of cashew, with an estimated eight hundred kilos per hectare. The country, however, falls short of the international benchmark of One thousand five hundred kilos per hectare.


The Executive Director of Competitive Cashew Initiative (ComCashew) Rita Weidinger, disclosed this at the 4th Edition of the Master Training Program to promote the African Cashew Value Chain in Ho today.


The five-day training programme is a joint initiative of ComCashew and the African Cashew Alliance (ACA) with support from the Cocoa Research Institute, Ghana (CRIG) and the Ministry of Food and Agriculture (MOFA).


Read more: Ghana Among 12 Countries Making Strides In Cashew Production



Volta Region to lead cashew production 10.05.2017

Volta Region to lead cashew production

Dr Archibald Yao Letsa, Volta Regional Minister has appealed to the Competitive Cashew Initiative and the German Development Co-operation (GIZ), to help increase cashew production in the Region.


He said the Region had a vast potential to become the leading cashew producer in the country and pleaded with the institutions to consider the Region on their promotional agenda.
    
Dr Letsa made the appeal in a speech read on his behalf at the 4th edition of the master training programme on cashew value chain promotion for 12 cashew producing countries in Africa in Ho.


Read more: Volta Region to lead cashew production



Ghana makes strides in cashew production 10.05.2017

Ghana makes strides in cashew production

Ghana has been announced as one of the leading countries making strides in the research and production of cashew with an estimated eight hundred kilos per hectares.


This was announced by the executive director of the competitive cashew initiative ( comcashew ) Rita Weidinger at the 4th edition of the master  training program held in Ho.


The five day training program which is aimed at promoting the African cashew value chain is  a joint initiative of the Comshew and the African cashew alliance with support from the Cocoa Research Institute, Ghana (CRIG) and  the Ministry of Food and Agriculture.


Rita Weidinger says, Ghana continues to lead the way in high yields of 800kg/hectares as against the international benchmark of 1500kg/hectares. She added that processing remains a challenge in Ghana and the sub-region.


Read more: Ghana makes strides in cashew production



A Master Training Program to promote the African Cashew Value Chain: TheFourth Edition (Session 1) 08.05.2017

A Master Training Program to promote the African Cashew Value Chain: TheFourth Edition (Session 1)

The aim of this unique Master Training Program, is to increase theoretical knowledge and practical skills of African cashew experts along the value chain and thus to further promote the competitiveness of African cashew.


The Competitive Cashew initiative (ComCashew) together with the African Cashew Alliance(ACA), with support from the Ministry of Food and Agriculture (MOFA) and the Cocoa Research Institute Ghana (CRIG), will hold the 1st session of the 4th edition of the Master Training Program for Cashew Value Chain Promotion from Monday, 8th to Friday, 12th May 2017 at the Chances Hotel, Ho, Volta Region. 


The program provides a platform for 75 cashew experts coming from Benin, Burkina Faso,  Cameroun, Côte d’Ivoire, Gambia, Ghana, Mali, Mozambique, Sierra Leone, Tanzania, Togo and Zambia to share knowledge, discuss best practices and lessons learnt as well as to build national and regional networks for future collaboration.


Returning to their host institutions, the participants will have a multiplier effect on the cashew industry when sharing their knowledge and experiences gained by attending this tailor-made training.


During knowledge sharing sessions of theories and their application, participants learn about all aspects of the cashew value chain from production and processing of raw cashew nuts, to economics, cashew market dynamics, marketing and financing mechanisms. Facilitators and technical experts teach, evaluate and re-design each training session according to participants’ needs.


The first session in Ho, will cover the cashew value chain concept, the dynamics of the cashew market and training material development. The highlight will be a field visit to the largest cashew processing factory in the subregion - USIBRAS, in Prampram. All sessions cover cross-cutting issues such as gender, policy development, sector regulations and nutrition value of cashew products.


Seth Osei-Akoto, Director Crop Services MOFA, states: “We, in Ghana, are amongst the first to develop and distribute improved planting materials on a carefully planned and sustainable manner. In collaboration with CRIG, we have so far supplied at least 400,000 improved cashew grafts to farmers in the Northern, Volta and Brong-Ahafo regions and we have planted 4,000 hectares of new cashew plantations.” In the sub-region, Ghana serves as a role model in cashew research and the development of improved planting materials.


 


Seven months. Three sessions. Three locations.


Rolled out in seven months, the Master Training Program is divided in three successive sessions to be held in Ghana and Côte d'Ivoire. In so called “inter-sessions”, the participants return to their host institutions to conduct field work, either individually or in groups, to deepen knowledge on a selected topic. After completion of the program, the participants become acknowledged cashew experts. They either train farmers, provide assistance to processors, or advice institutions in their home countries. At the heart of the Master Training Program are facilitators and technical experts who teach, evaluate and potentially re-design each training session according to participants’ needs. The training contents are developed with great support and commitment from various ComCashew partners.  They use stimulating presentations, interactive role plays and lively discussions to deliver trainings.


 


The Competitive Cashew initiative (ComCashew)


The Competitive Cashew initiative (ComCashew) constitutes a new type of multi‐stakeholder partnership in development cooperation. The initiative is mainly funded by the German Federal Ministry for Economic Cooperation and Development (BMZ) for its third phase which started from May 1, 2016. Private companies and government and donor agencies also support the Initiative. The Deutsche Gesellschaft für Internationale Zusammenarbeit (GIZ) GmbH has been commissioned with the management of the project with Fairmatch Support as an implementing partner who provides consultation on technical issues and facilitate linkages between farmers and processors. ComCashew benefits from the diverse commercial and technical expertise of their private and public sector partners. Important cooperation partners in Ghana are the Ministry of Food and Agriculture (MOFA) and the Cocoa Research Institute of Ghana (CRIG).  


For more information, please contact:


Cynthia Benon, Manager of the Master Training Program, al-da.benon@giz.de or


Sylvia Pobee, Communication Manager, sylvia.pobee@giz.de


 



International Workers’ Day – Women at work 01.05.2017

International Workers’ Day – Women at work

In many countries around the globe the 1st of May is celebrated as “International Workers’ Day”. ComCashew congratulates all workers especially women for their immense contribution.


Every year, workers all over the world commemorate this day whose origins lie in the industrial sector of the early 20th century, by addressing major challenges of the modern industry such as fair wages, good working conditions and job security.


Twentieth century industrial society required a larger workforce as majority of men had been enrolled to fight in the world war. This saw more women joining the workforce. This essentialist role of women in crisis times contributed to the rise in the women labour. Twentieth century European history seems to have paved the way for women’s employment in the industrial sector and subsequently for further professional possibilities regardless of the sector.


In Africa, female employment rate is steadily rising but not without challenges. Considering that the global demand of for cashews is increasing globally, the sector is expected to offer more jobs throughout the developing cashew value-chain. So far, ComCashew and partner interventions have already created more than 21,000 jobs in cashew processing industry, 80 % of them for women. On the production side, ComCashew and partners have trained more than 400,000 farmers, about 22% women, on Good Agricultural Practices.  The development of the cashew sector and women’s employment go hand in hand. Together, they have a great potential to contribute to the economic growth of cashew-producing countries and thereby, contributing to poverty reduction. The cashew sector can currently boast of prominent women professionals who have paved the way for others in the generally male-dominated sector.


Read more about Women in Cashew 


As we celebrate the International Workers’ Day, consider investing in the cashew sector. Contribute to a reduction in Africa’s unemployment and poverty rate and help your country’s society progress and pave new ways. Today, we celebrate cooperation of workforce, for women and men, and its gift of independence for everyone.


 



Solution in a Nutshell 03.04.2017

Solution in a Nutshell

Cultivation of cashew nuts has improved lives of farmers in Ghana. For a long time the potential of these kernels remained unexploited.


These trees have changed my life, they have made me a happy woman,’ says Victoria Ataa, lovingly patting the bark of the tree that provides her with shade from the midday sun. The Ghanaian farmer is seated under a cashew tree in the village of Congo. Its fruits have not only freed the 66-year-old from abject poverty, they have also made her a role model for thousands of other farmers across Africa.


Read more: Cashew farming in Ghana: Solution in a Nutshell CASHEW-ANBAU IN GHANA: Der Kern der Lösung



CCA to allow and facilitate in land exportation of Ivorian RCN 03.04.2017

CCA to allow and facilitate in land exportation of Ivorian RCN

CCA to allow and facilitate in land exportation of Ivorian RCN destined for processing in neighboring countries


Following the ACA’s first Cashew Stakeholder Meeting held in Accra on


29th March 2016 to formulate a vision for the African Cashew Industry,


a Board meeting of the Competitive Cashew Initiative (ComCashew)


was held on the 30th. The African Cashew Alliance (ACA) is a constituting


board member of ComCashew and as such, sat in this meeting.


Read more


CCA to allow and facilitate in land exportation of Ivorian RCN



ACA urges government of Ghana to sign onto Consultative International Cashew Council 31.03.2017

ACA urges government of Ghana to sign onto Consultative International Cashew Council


The acting managing director for the African Cashew Alliance, Mr. Ernest Mintah has called on 


the governemnt of Ghana to sign unto the Consultative International Cashew Council (CICC), 


to help address challenges confronting stakeholders in the cashew industry. 


He made this call during a stakeholder visioning forum in Accra on Wednesday March 29, 2017.


The forum brought together various actors to formulate a ten-year vision for the cashew sector until 2017.


Read More


ACA urges government of Ghana to sign onto Consultative International Cashew Council



Vietnam Cashew association expands reach to Africa 31.03.2017

Vietnam Cashew association expands reach to Africa

The Vietnam Cashew Association inked three memoranda of understanding with its African partners at a conference for international customers in the cashew sector in Ho Chi Minh City


The partners include the Association of Cashew Exporters in Ivory Coast, the National Cashew Association


of Nigeria and the National Council of Benin Cashew Exporters.


Another eight agreements were also reached by cashew exporters and importers at the event.


According to President of the Vietnam Cashew Association Nguyen Duc Thanh, Vietnam has processed


about one million tonnes of raw cashew nuts annually for the past two years.


Read More


Vietnam Cashew association expands reach to Africa



ACA Holds Stakeholder Forum in Accra 30.03.2017

ACA Holds Stakeholder Forum in Accra

"Ghana must look into strengthening its cashew industry to replace cocoa as the effects of climate change advances in the future" - Sunil Dahiya, Chief Business Officer - African Cashew Alliance (ACA).


Mr. Dahiya made this known at a Cashew Stakeholder Forum in Acrra on Wednesday March 29, 2017.


The Forum hosted by the Ministry of Food and Agriculture of Ghana brought together various actors and


players along the cashew value chain. 


Read More


Cashew Holds Ghana's Future


 


 


 


 


 



ACA becomes Lead Facilitator of the Private Sector Wing of the Cashew International Consultative Council (CICC) 27.03.2017

ACA becomes Lead Facilitator of the Private Sector Wing of the Cashew International Consultative Council (CICC)


On 21st March 2017, ACA President, Mr. Florentino Nanque, met with Dr.Adama Coulibaly,


the Managing Director of the Conseil du Coton et de l’Anacarde of Côte d’Ivoire, for a working


session to discuss partnership with the newly established Cashew International Consultative Council (CICC).


This was also an opportunity to reinforce ACA’s partnership with the Conseil du Coton et de l’Anacarde of


Côte d’Ivoire (CCA) which manages the new international cashew body (CICC).


Read more 


ACA becomes Lead Facilitator of the Private Sector Wing of the Cashew International Consultative Council (CICC)



Over the floor at the cashewboer 23.03.2017

Over the floor at the cashewboer


Half of all the world's cashews are produced in Africa. The cashew sector provides more job opportunities for women and for many families, it is an extra source of income.


several Projects work along the cashew value chain and are committed to more jobs and higher annual salary.


Read more here


Over The Floor at The Cashewboer


 

 

 


Cashew generates US$244.5m in export revenue 20.03.2017

Cashew generates US$244.5m in export revenue

The total export revenue realized from cashew in 2016 was US$244,500,000, making the commodity the leading non-traditional crop export revenue generator.


The total export revenue realized from cashew production in Ghana in 2016 was US$244,500,000, making the commodity the leading non-traditional crop export revenue generator.


Ghana produces between 50,000 to 70, 0000mt of raw cashew nuts annually, but it exports far more than that figure. Mr. Owusu attributed it to the conducive business environment in the country, thus making Ghana a preferred destination in the Sub-Region for cashew traders across the world. 


Read More: 


Cashew generates US$244.5m in export revenue



Enabling the Business of Agriculture 16.03.2017

Enabling the Business of Agriculture

Agriculture and global food systems play a central role in meeting the World Bank Group’s twin goals of eliminating extreme poverty and boosting shared prosperity.


ComCashew contributed to the preparation of a report on “Enabling the Business of Agriculture” prepared by the World Bank. Our contribution was on requirements for the trade of raw cashew nuts from Benin and Burkina Faso. See below the link to the final report which covers 62 countries. The report highlights trade regulations in 62 countries across the world.


Read More:


Enabling the Business of Agriculture


 


 



International Women’s Day 2017: Celebrating Female Groundbreakers in the cashew sector 08.03.2017

International Women’s Day 2017: Celebrating Female Groundbreakers in the cashew sector

ComCashew congratulates all women around the world, especially those in the cashew sector, for their contribution to making the world a better place. Keep up the good work!


The cashew sector has seen the emergence of determined women over the past couple of years. These women have played influential roles in major positive developments within the sector from production, through processing to sector organisation. 


The Competitive Cashew initiative recognizes the role of women in the development of the African cashew sector. Among other things, ComCashew focuses on trainings and skills development of female farmers, processors and other female cashew experts. So far, about 80, 000 female cashew farmers have been trained on topics including Good Agricultural Practices (GAP) and harvest and post-harvest techniques. ComCashew through the Master Training Program works to develop the capacity of women to encourage a more active participation in leadership roles in the sector.


In celebration of this year’s International Women’s Day, we share some of the inspiring stories behind the success of dynamic women in the Cashew sector.


Read more about Women groundbreakers in Cashew


Women Leaders in the Cashew Sector



CICC Promoted at SIA in Paris 07.03.2017

CICC Promoted at SIA in Paris


The International Cashew Advisory Council (CICC), the body responsible for the global macroeconomic management of cashews, was presented Thursday at the Paris International Agricultural Show (SIA 2017) On the occasion of the promotional day organized by the Côte d'Ivoire cotton and cashew nut council. 


During this session, the Director General of the Ivorian regulator of the sector, Coulibaly Adama, presented the vision, objectives, bodies, members, organization and practical operation of the CICC, Baptism on November 18, 2016. 


 


read more here: 


A promotional day for Cashew at SIA 2017



Cashew farming in Ivory Coast 07.03.2017

Cashew farming in Ivory Coast


The demand for cashew nuts is growing - but African farmers miss out on most of the benefits. That's because most of the value of the nuts comes from processing - and that happens somewhere else.


find out more here


Cashew farming in Ivory Coast



Cashew nuts from Ghana 21.02.2017

Cashew nuts from Ghana

Africa's cross with industrialization


David Signer embarked on a fact finding mission to Ghana to find out how the most talked about emerging cash crop “Cashew” is produced. This comes just months after group journalists numbering about 11 undertook a similar journey to Ghana last November.


David has since published his observations in a Swiss based newspaper  NZZ (Neue Züricher Zeitung)  his article showcases the worldwide growing demand for cashew as a positive prospect for economic growth, employment and income creation for cashew actors in Ghana and portrays how different actors along the value chain profit from the cashew sector in Ghana. Among other things it features the stories of:



  • Usibras cashew processing, the biggest cashew processing factory in West Africa, with a focus on product quality, local job and income creation

  • Madam Mary Sarpong,  a female cashew farmer in Wenchi

  • The role of ComCashew and partners as well as their investments in the development of the cashew sector in Ghana.


        Read more:


         Cashew nuts from Ghana



Meet the 29 year Old Entrepreneur who is about to change Cashew processing in Tanzania 21.02.2017

Meet the 29 year Old Entrepreneur who is about to change Cashew processing in Tanzania

Fahad Awadh has raised $500,000 to process Cashews in Tanzania


 


Cashews are a major export crop for Tanzania and a significant source of income for many small farmers. But value addition in the form of processing of raw cashew and capacity building in this sector is wanting.


The lack of local processors in Tanzania means there are very few jobs created from this valuable commodity; cashews are an important foreign exchange earner for the country.


Fahad Awadh, an ambitious 29-year old entrepreneur from Tanzania, recently moved back home from Canada to set up a cashew processing facility in Tanzania in an effort to bring international standards and traceability to the cashew nuts. He is the founder of YYTZ Agro-Processing, a cashew processing company that is adding value locally while creating jobs and boosting the income of farmers and the community as a whole.


Read more:


This 29-Year Old Entrepreneur Just Raised $500,000 To Process Cashews In Tanzania


 



A boon for Burkina Faso’s cashew market 21.02.2017

A boon for Burkina Faso’s cashew market

US$4m loan to revive Burkina Faso’s cashew market


With support from the African Development Bank (AFDB), Burkina Faso has been awarded a US $4-million loan from the Climate Investment Funds’ Forest Investment Program (CIF FIP), to revive its cashew sector and mitigate climate change, working through an innovative public-private sector business model between the national union of farmers’ cooperatives and the government.


Read more


A boon for Burkina Faso’s cashew market



International Green Week 2017 01.02.2017

International Green Week 2017

GIZ along with many other BMZ partners was invited to join hands in showcasing how a world without hunger is possible with fair trade and innovation.


Between 2010 and 2015 alone, GIZ has helped put an end to hunger and malnutrition for some eleven million people. At its stand, GIZ informed visitors of the support it has provided to cashew farmers in Africa on behalf of the German Government, and how this has improved for example cashew cropping and marketing and greatly increased farmers’ income. To date, to the surprise of many visitors, ComCashew measures have benefited more than 400,000 smallholders, enabling them to raise their net cashew-based income by around USD 160 – with some farmers now earning twice what they did before.


The GIZ booth was met with great interest and led to many interesting discussions around cashew. The visitors were taken aback by the effort and time put into the whole process of cashew sector development.  Visitors asked questions such as “how does it grow? what does it take to transform RCN to a consumable cashew nut?” among others. Following the invitation to visitors of the booth to answer three quiz questions, and being confronted with the rewarding choice of chocolate, moringa smoothie or cashew nuts most chose cashew. This high interest led to a distribution of almost 4,000 small (50g) cashew packages which were thankfully contributed by ComCashew partners, Intersnack and TDG.


ComCashew also used alternative publicity opportunities such as inviting the excellent professional cook, Moritz Katz, for a cooking show that was highly appreciated by visitors to the stand. In addition to that, a large stage was made available to families and school classes for an interactive learning experience on cashew, crowned with a cashew prize.


        


To read more on this year’s Green Week 2017 please click below: 


Green Week 2017. Fair living conditions, fair consumers, fair trade


 



Cashew in the German News 31.01.2017

Cashew in the German News

On September 4, 2016, 11 journalists from various media houses embarked on a press trip to visit some GIZ projects such as ComCashew and report on their activities in Ghana.


The trip which lasted from 5th to 9th September, 2016 was an opportunity for the journalists to interact with beneficiaries of GIZ.  Following their visit, the journalists have published articles on their visit in various German press.


These articles showcases the worldwide growing demand for cashew as a positive prospect for economic growth, employment and income creation for cashew actors in Ghana and portrays how different actors along the value chain profit from the cashew sector in Ghana. Among other things it features the stories of:



  • Madam Mary Sarpong,  a female cashew farmer in Wenchi

  • A female grafter at the agricultural research station in Wenchi

  • MIM cashew processing with a focus on product quality, local job and income creation

  • The role of ComCashew and partners as well as their investments in the development of the cashew sector in Ghana.


Read more:


Cashewnüsse bringen den Aufschwung in Ghana


Cashew-Nuss wird Exportschlager


Der Kern des Aufschwungs in Ghana


Von nutzlosen Kernen zum Exporthit


Afrikas neuer Exportschlager


Cashew-Nüsse Cashew-Nuss wird Exportschlager


Höhenflug für eine harte Nuss



Rita Weidinger : "La formation et la technologie, les clefs pour développer la filière cajou" 13.12.2016

Rita Weidinger : "La formation et la technologie, les clefs pour développer la filière cajou"

CommodAfrica interview la Diretrice de ComCashew au SIETTA 2016


ComCashew a participé au et soutenu activement le Salon International des Equipements des Technologies et de la Transformation de l’Anacarde (SIETTA 2016). Pendant ce salon, la Directrice Exécutive du projet, Rita Weidinger a proposé qu’il faut que la Côte d'Ivoire mette les bouchées doubles pour accroître son taux de transformation. Selon Rita, pour s'industrialiser, il faut que la Côte d’Ivoire adapte des technologies de qualité et forme les acteurs dans le secteur de l’anacarde.


Dans un entretien avec CommodAfrica, la directrice a révélé que ComCashew ouvrira un bureau à la Côte d’Ivoire l'année prochaine.


En savoir plus: Rita Weidinger: "La formation et la technologie, les clefs pour développer la filière cajou"


 


 


 



Le Bulletin ComCashew - 7ème édition sur les équipements, les technologies et les innovations de la Transformation de l’Anacarde“ 06.12.2016

Le Bulletin ComCashew - 7ème édition sur les équipements, les technologies et les innovations de la Transformation de l’Anacarde“

La 7ème édition du Bulletin ComCashew est consacrée à la deuxième édition du SIETTA 2016 et se concentre principalement sur la transformation de la noix de cajou en Afrique.


Les détails sur la plus importante foire de traitement du cajou au monde, SIETTA 2016, les avis des fournisseurs d'équipements et des informations détaillées sur la transformation de la noix de cajou par des experts de l'industrie, et des recettes délicieuses et nutritives sont tous présentés dans ce bulletin. Le bulletin présente également la cérémonie de remise de la troisième édition du Programme de Maitres Formateurs  (MTP), la mise à jour du marché et les événements à venir sur la noix de cajou.


Bonne lecture du bulletin!


Le Bulletin ComCashew - 7ème édition sur les équipements, les technologies et les innovations de la Transformation de l’Anacarde“



Une troisième Génération de Maîtres Formateurs diplômés‘ 06.12.2016

Une troisième Génération de Maîtres Formateurs diplômés‘

« Les Maîtres Formateurs sont des agents de changement dans le secteur qui est certes encore non structuré, mais a un fort potentiel’. » - Mme Rita Weidinger, Directrice Exécutive, initiative du Cajou Compétitif (ComCashew).


Agents de Changement dans un secteur avec un fort potentiel, c’est ainsi que Rita Weidinger s’adresse aux 90 participants  de  la  troisième  et  dernière  session  du Programme des Maîtres Formateurs, qui a pris fin le 28 octobre 2016. La Directrice Exécutive a mis une fois de plus  en  exergue  l’importance  de  chaque  Maître Formateur dans leur rôle d’Experts, de multiplicateurs de connaissances et  d’impliqués individuels dans le secteur très  prometteur  de  cajou  dans  la  sous-région.  Une troisième génération de Maîtres Formateurs -Agents de Changement –a été formée à cette troisième édition, conjointement organisée par ComCashew et l’Alliance de Cajou  Africain  (ACA).  Cette  nouvelle  génération  est composée  de  69  experts  de  cajou  et  20  personnes ressources,  venant  de  12  pays  de  la  sous-région.


Représentant  différents  background  professionnels  et travaillant le long de la chaine de valeur du cajou, les participants avaient une opportunité unique d’acquérir de l’expérience et des connaissances lors des sessions théoriques et pratiques de formation, mais également à


travers l’apprentissage et l’échange de paire-à-paire pour Une troisième Génération de Maîtres Formateurs diplômés impacter leurs domaines de travail respectifs.


Après trois éditions du Programme des Maîtres formateurs, plus de 180 experts de cajou ont été formés pour devenir  des  Maîtres  formateurs  confirmés.  Ils  font partie du large et diversifié réseau et unis par le même voyage d’apprentissage inégalé dans le secteur -Le


Programme des Maîtres Formateurs.


Quelques commentaires des diplômés du MTP:


« Je peux être un agent de changement en étant un modèle dans  le  maintien  et  la  préservation  du  niveau  de connaissance  acquise  et  en  utilisant  les  aptitudes acquises  pour développer davantage l’organisation. » Roland Houessou, Ingénieur Agricole (Tolaro Global Burkina Faso)


« Le  MTP  m’a  équipé  de  nouvelles  aptitudes  que j’ignorais totalement telles que le greffage, la recherche de greffons dans une plantation d’arbres élites. Mes connaissances  sur  la  transformation  se  sont approfondies et je peux dire que mes attentes ont été dépassées. » Judith Odei, Directrice des Opérations, (Mim Processing Ghana)



The Cashew Equipment And Technology Fair 06.12.2016

The Cashew Equipment And Technology Fair


 


The Cashew Equipment and Technology Fair


Ivory Coast has become the world's largest producer and exporter of raw cashew nuts, producing more than 700,000 tons in 2015. Nevertheless, similar to all cashew-producing countries, in the sub region, the processing rate of the fast growing crop is below 10% of the National production.


The low industrialization of the cashew sector deprives Ivory Coast of an important additional value, thus reducing job creation opportunities. The development of local processing of cashew products has become a major objective in the country and this approach is shared by most African cashew producing countries, whose production is more than 60% of global production.


To help realize the ambitious vision of President Alassane Ouattara, to ensure that 100% of the nuts produced in the country were processed locally by means of 2020 and to help promote the equipment, techniques and better profitability of processing units in Cote d'Ivoire and in the sub region, the Cotton and cashew Council (CCA) Organised for the first time in 2014, the Salon International des Equipements et Technologies de transformation de l'Anacarde - SIETTA.


Building on the success of the first edition of SIETTA in 2014, the Cotton and Cashew Council (CCA) Abidjan.


Under the theme: Industrialization of the Cashew sector and Citizenship for a new Ivory Coast, the event brought together more than 20 equipment manufacturers, suppliers, exhibitors and close to 12,000 visitors from the estimation of the organizers from all over the world to exhibit and sell Their equipment, meet investors from all levels of the cashew value chain and learn about the profitability of the African processing industry.


In the course of the exhibition, the exhibition will be held at the end of the year.


 


The Consultative International Cashew Council (CICC)


One of the highlights of SIETTA 2016 was a high-level technical meeting did Brought together experts from 11 African countries at the Palm Club Hotel in Abidjan to discuss and agree on the importance of founding a consultative platform dubbed the "Consultative International Cashew Council (CICC) ". This historic consultative platform came into being on November 17, 2016 when African Ministers signed the Convention to the International Cashew Council (CICC). This significant stride for the African cashew sector has set the foundation for future regional / international engagement and consultation of cashew producing governments.


The CICC is an Ivorian initiative to provide Africa with a consultative framework for the development of a flourishing cashew production and processing industry in Africa. The CICC offers its members, national governments of cashews-producing countries, a platform to represent their interests and discuss current issues in the sector. (CAA), the Global Cashew Council under the International, is a member of the African Cashew Alliance (ACA), the World Bank, the World Bank, the African Development Bank and the EU Nut and Dried Fruit Council and the Vietnamese Cashew Association VINACAS are affiliates to the Council and act as observers and advisors to the CICC. 



The ComCashew News Bulletin – 7th edition on Cashew Processing Equipment, Technology and Innovation 30.11.2016

The ComCashew News Bulletin – 7th edition on Cashew Processing Equipment, Technology and Innovation

The 7th edition of the ComCashew News Bulletin is dedicated to the second edition of the cashew processing equipment fair, SIETTA 2016 and focuses mainly on Cashew processing in Africa.


Details of the world’s largest cashew processing equipment fair, SIETTA 2016, opinions of equipment suppliers and detailed information on cashew processing by industry experts and delicious and nutritious recipes are all featured in this bulletin. The bulletin also features the Graduation of the third edition of the Master Trainers’ Programme(MTP), Market update and upcoming cashew events. Enjoy reading the bulletin!


The ComCashew News Bulletin – 7th edition on Cashew Processing Equipment, Technology and Innovation



National Farmers Day 2016 - ComCashew congratulates all farmers as we celebrate this year’s National farmers’ day! 30.11.2016

National Farmers Day 2016 - ComCashew congratulates all farmers as we celebrate this year’s National farmers’ day!

ComCashew celebrates Peter Gyan, the successful cashew farmer


In a bid to achieve its aim of improving the livelihood of farmers through poverty reduction, the Competitive Cashew initiative organises training workshops such as the Master Training Program, to promote Good Agricultural Practices among the producers of cashew. These training programs have enabled about 414 509 farmers to increase the quantity of raw nuts they produce and hence culminated in an increase of about $161 in their income.


Today, we celebrate Peter Gyan, a beneficiary of ComCashew’s training programs and other interventions. Peter Gyan is a cashew farmer in Sebreni, in the Jaman South District of the Brong Ahafo region in Ghana. Gyan, who won the Best Cashew Farmer award in 2009, first decided to become a cashew farmer in 1997 and currently owns four cashew farms, the largest of which is 42 acres large.


Referring to the cashew tree ‘as the wonder tree,’ Gyan explains that cashew farming has been a very productive venture for him.


Read more about Peter Gyan in page 21 of the ComCashew Newsbulletin – 6th edition on Cashew Policies and Review of Harvest Season.


 



A Third Generation of Master Trainer Graduates 30.11.2016

A Third Generation of Master Trainer Graduates

“The Master Trainers are Agents of Change in a sector which is admittedly still unstructured, but has great potential”. - Ms. Rita Weidinger, Executive Director, Competitive Cashew initiative (ComCashew).


Agents of Change in a sector with great potential, is how Rita Weidinger addressed the 90 participants at the third and final session of the Master Training Programme, which ended on October 28, 2016. The Executive Director highlighted once more the importance of each Master Trainer in their role as experts, knowledge multipliers and individuals involved in the very promising cashew sector in the sub-region. A third generation of Master Trainers - Agents of Change - was trained in this third training edition, jointly organised by ComCashew and the African Cashew Alliance (ACA). This new generation is made up of 69 cashew experts and 20 resource persons, from 12 countries in the sub-region. Representing different professional backgrounds and working along the cashew value chain, the participants had not only a unique opportunity to gain experience and knowledge through practical and theoretical training sessions, but also through peer-to-peer learning and exchange to impact their respective fields of work.


After three editions of the Master Training Programme, over 180 cashew experts have been trained to become acknowledged Master Trainers. They are part of a large and diverse network and united by the same learning journey unequalled in the sector - The Master Training Programme


Some comments from MTP graduates:


“I can be a change agent by being a role model in maintaining and preserving the level of knowledge I gained and by using the skills I have acquired especially for further development of the organization.” Roland Houessou, Agricultural Engineer (Tolaro Global Burkina Faso)


“The MTP equipped me with new skills like grafting, picking of scions from scion banks .... My knowledge on processing was deepened and I can say that my expectations were exceeded.” Judith Odei, Director of Operations, (Mim Processing Ghana)


 


 



Global Delivery Initiative: Know-How that works 29.11.2016

Global Delivery Initiative: Know-How that works

The GDI helps practitioners prepare for and address delivery challenges and unexpected problems throughout implementation. The Global Delivery Library provides resources for this purpose.


The Global Delivery Initiative (GDI) is a collaborative effort to create a collective and cumulative evidence base of delivery know-how to inform development practice and improve implementation. The GDI and its partners support practitioners on the ground to adapt to dynamic contexts and solve stubborn delivery challenges. The Initiative also aims at promoting integrated approaches of delivery by forging a global community of partners to build a more systematic, cumulative, and strategic understanding of how to deliver. One way of achieving this is through its Global Delibrary Library.


The library contatins a wide variety of resources on delivery and adaptive management, contributed by GDI partners, and geared toward informing practitioners' decision-making. One of such is ComCashew's study on "How to Implement a Broad-Based Approach to Developing the Africa Cashew Market."


You can now download the study here:


"How to Implement a Broad-Based Approach to Developing the Africa Cashew Market."


You can also find other resources here:


http://globaldeliveryinitiative.org/global-delivery-library


http://globaldeliveryinitiative.org/


 


 


Ouverture à Abidjan de la troisième session de formation des maîtres formateurs 26.10.2016

Ouverture à Abidjan de la troisième session de formation des maîtres formateurs

En collaboration avec l'Alliance Africaine du Cajou (ACA) et le Conseil Coton Anacarde (CCA) de la Côte d'Ivoire, ComCashew a ouvert la troisième session de la troisième édition du programme de formation des maîtres formateurs ce lundi 24 octobre, 2016


Ce programme qui se déroule sur 4 jours offrira une plateforme d'échanges au 95 experts de cajou venant du Ghana, Bénin, Burkina Faso, Côte d'Ivoire, Mozambique, Gambie, Tchad, Sierra Leone, Sénégal, Mali, Togo et Nigeria pour partager leurs connaissances, discuter des meilleurs pratiques et les leçons apprises ainsi que de construire des réseaux nationaux et régionaux pour collaboration à l'avenir.


En lire plus:


3ème édition du programme des maîtres formateurs pour la chaîne de valeur de cajou africain: ouverture à Abidjan de la troisième session de formation


Formation à Abidjan pour la promotion de la chaîne de valeur du cajou africain


 



Cashew Policies and Review of Harvest Season 23.09.2016

Cashew Policies and Review of Harvest Season

The 6th Edition of the ComCashew News Bulletin


The second phase of the African Cashew initiative (ACi) came to a successful end in April 2016 to usher in its third phase as Competitive Cashew initiative (ComCashew) . Change Accompanies growth but comes with its own challenges and struggles. We appreciate your patience during this change process as love especially this edition of the bulletin Took a while to be published. This edition of The ComCashew News Bulletin  is Mainly focused on cashew Policies and Review of Harvest Season. 


This year, the African cashew sector has Attracted the interest of major policymakers and Hence, experienced a significant amount of change. The bulletin THEREFORE, highlights the policies Which havebeen Formulated and Implemented in the cashew sector of various African cashew-producing countries. It also features a yield survey of the five project countries in Which Operates ComCashew thus revealed some interesting facts about the harvest season this year. 


This 6 th edition thus celebrates ComCashew for winning the OECD DAC Prize Award. The Master Training Program (MTP), Which what leden ComCashew and its partners to create a pool of experts cashew in West Africa is so featured. The third edition of the program has Brought together over 90 participants from over 10 countries in Africa. The first and second sessions were held in May and August 2016.


Read more here:  Cashew Policies and Review of Harvest Season



Olam International recognised at #23 in Fortune ‘Change the World’ list 14.09.2016

Olam International recognised at #23 in Fortune ‘Change the World’ list


We congratulate Olam, a valued partner of ComCashew for being recognised by Fortune magazine in it's 'Change the World' list which recognises companies that have made a positive social impact through activities that are part of their core business strategy. The impact of Olam's Livelihood Charter - in which cashew and other nut initiatives play a crucial role - was recognised. 


See more at:


Olam International recognised at #23 in Fortune ‘Change the World’ list 



Capacity development through Master Training Program for cashew value chains 19.07.2016

Capacity development through Master Training Program for cashew value chains


The Competitive Cashew initiative (ComCashew), was one of 140 participants from 22 countries at the 2015 edition of the International Cashew Conference held in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania.


The conference, which was under the theme “Cashew for Health, Wealth and Environment” provided a platform for the discussion of recent developments in the African Cashew sector. Among the wide variety of topics discussed by participants on the cashew value chain were crop improvements, protection, advances in biotechnology, value addition, technology transfer, marketing and policy issues.


Over 35 oral and poster presentations were made. Comcashew's presentation on ‘Capacity development through Master Training Program for cashew value chains’ has been selected for publication in the conference proceedings following a peer review process.


 To find out more on the conference proceedings and ComCashew's presentation,


follow the link below:Extension and technology transfer, page 242


 Proceedings of the Third International Cashew Conference 


 


 


 



SIETTA 2016 Officially Launched 15.07.2016

SIETTA 2016 Officially Launched


The Minister of Industry in Ivory Caost, Mr. Jean Claude officially launched the 2nd edition of the International Exhibition of Equipment and Technologies for the Transformation of cashew (SIETTA 2016). The colorful event took place at Hotel TIAMA in Abidjan.  


SIETTA 2016: the access ticket set at 1,000 CFA



ACI/ComCashew at BMGF 04.07.2016

ACI/ComCashew at BMGF


Dr. Ulrich Sabel-Koschella, head of GIZ regional agriculture value chain projects supported by Ms. Rita Weidinger, Executive Director of the Competitive Cashew initiative (ComCashew) represented GIZ and participated in a learning lunch organized by the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation in Seattle.


Dr. Sabel-Koschella and Ms. Weidinger made a presentation on the lessons from 7 years of implementing the African/Competitive Cashew Initiative and other regional agricultural value chain projects in cocoa, cotton, rice and coffee.


Whilst companies focus on supply of specific commodities, farmers use the cash influx from these crops for a broader farming and household systems. Cashew provides a much-needed income during the so-called hungry period, giving high leverage for an increased family income - for inputs for annual crops and school fees. 


The Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation was a major funding partner of the African Cashew initiative (ACi), now known as, Competitive Cashew (ComCashew) for its third phase of implementation.


Christian Merz, who is now programme manager at the Gates foundation, and previously with SAP, explained SAP’s successful collaboration with ACI for tracking sourcing from individual farmers using IT solutions. 


The occasion was also used to present replica copies of the DAC prize ‘Taking innovation to scale’ which ACi received in April 2016.


 



Ivory Coast: Africa's cashew nuts champions 21.05.2016

Ivory Coast: Africa's cashew nuts champions


Ivory Coast, the world's biggest cocoa exporter has just overtaken India to become the world's biggest exporter of cashew nuts, too.


Read more at : Ivory Coast: Africa's cashew nuts champions



Ghana's ministry of trade calls for an ECOWAS cashew market 13.05.2016

Ghana's ministry of trade calls for an ECOWAS cashew market


Mr Fredric Alipui, a Policy Advisor at the Ministry of Trade and Industry, has called for the establishment of an Economic Community for West African State (ECOWAS) Cashew Market to make the crop competitive in the sub-region.


Read more : Trade Ministry calls for ECOWAS cashew market



Ghana's President pledges support for cashew sector 04.05.2016

Ghana's President pledges support for cashew sector


President John Dramani Mahama has pledged to support cashew farmers to achieve their production levels and ensure availability of the cash crop for both domestic industries and export.


 See more at:President Mahama vows to support cashew sector



Ivory Coast, Olam wants closer access to producers of cashew nuts 29.04.2016

Ivory Coast, Olam wants closer access to producers of cashew nuts


Strengthening relationship with farmers is the best way to secure supplies, whether cashew, cotton or cocoa. "He who controls the production control the market," says Theodore Partheeban, Sr Vice President at Olam International. 


Read more: Ivory Coast, Olam wants closer to producers of cashew nuts



African Cashew Initiative of the BMZ wins OECD Award 22.04.2016

African Cashew Initiative of the BMZ wins OECD Award


Check out The International Journal for Rural Development - Rural21's, feature on the African Cashew initiative, for winning this year’s OECD-DAC prize.


The Development Assistance Committee (DAC) of the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) awards the prize as recognition of innovative approaches that have gone beyond the pilot phase to reach wider application.


Read more: African Cashew Initiative of the BMZ wins OECD Award



Introducing The international journal Rural 21 22.04.2016

Introducing The international journal Rural 21


The international journal Rural 21 has dedicated more than 40 years to all topics surrounding rural development. Its ambition is to further those strategies and policies that strengthen rural areas of developing and newly industrialising countries and encourage their implementation. The journal addresses the complete range of relevant themes – from agriculture and fisheries via capacity building and education through to health and social security, energy supply and trade. Center-stage is always devoted to inquiring into how measures and strategies can contribute to global food security and to reducing poverty.


See more at: The International Journal for Rural Development - Rural21



Cashew farmers to increase yields 19.04.2016

Cashew farmers to increase yields


The African Cashew initiative (ACi) says the cashew crop sector represents real potential for development, value creation and the fight against poverty in rural areas.


See more at: Cashew farmers to increase yields



African gov'ts urged to invest in cashew industry 18.04.2016

African gov'ts urged to invest in cashew industry


Ms Rita Weidinger, Executive Director of African Cashew Initiative (ACI), has called on African governments to invest in the production and policy development of the cashew sector, to increase economic value and enhance private investment.


Read more: African gov'ts urged to invest in cashew industry



Trade Ministry, others confer on improving cashew sector 18.04.2016

Trade Ministry, others confer on improving cashew sector


The government of Ghana has assured of working to end the challenges confronting the country’s cashew industry where about ten thousand jobs are reported to have been lost.  


See more at: Trade Ministry, others confer on improving cashew sector 



Cashew: agriculture goldmine 18.04.2016

Cashew: agriculture goldmine


In spite of the unduly lower share of investment in the country’s cashew production sector from government, the sector still holds much potential as it is seen to be one of the most promising economic boosters -- capable of generating between US$400 and US$500million revenue for the country and improving livelihoods of many rural women farmers.


See more at: Cashew: agriculture goldmine



Government to outline measures to improve the cashew sector in Ghana 11.04.2016

Government to outline measures to improve the cashew sector in Ghana


The Minister of Trade and Industry, Mr. Ekow Spio-Garbrah, on Thursday, April 2016 announced that the Government of Ghana would come up with a memorandum of understanding (MoU) within the next 60 days to outline measures to promote the production, sale and processing of cashew nuts in the country.


The Minister said this during a visit to USIBRAS, a Brazilian-owned cashew processing plant in Prampram, Ghana.


Read more at: Gov't to outline measures to improve cashew production


 



Congratulations to AFRICAJOU! 30.03.2016

Congratulations to AFRICAJOU!

AFRICAJOU has recently been awarded the 3rd prize for the Best Export Enterprise 2015.


The prize was awarded by the Ministry of Commerce in Ivory Coast.


ACi congratulates AFRICAJOU and wishes it the best in all its endeavours.



Félicitations à AFRICAJOU! 30.03.2016

Félicitations à AFRICAJOU!

AFRICAJOU a récemment reçu le 3ème Prix d'Excellence de la Meilleure Enterprise Exportatrice 2015.


Le prix lui a été remis par le Ministère du commence de la Cote d'Ivoire.


iCA félicite AFRICAJOU et lui souhaite le meilleur dans tous ses efforts.


 



Cashew exporters want export ban reviewed! 17.03.2016

Cashew exporters want export ban reviewed!


Cashew exporters want the government of Ghana to as a matter of urgency review the ban on the exportation of raw cashew nut out of the country.The trade ministry yesterday issued a directive that effective May 31, there will be a ban on the exportation of raw cashew nuts from Ghana. According to the ministry it will confiscate any raw cashew brought into the port for export.


Read more: Review ban on cashew exports : Exporters to government. 



Advice from this year's OECD prizewinners 16.03.2016

Advice from this year's OECD prizewinners


The Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development announced Wednesday at its Paris headquarters the winners of its second annual “DAC Award for Taking Development to Scale.” Judged by development professionals across the public and private sectors for their scalability and innovation, 10 finalists and three winners included a mobile payment platform, a network of plant health clinics, a cashew manufacturer and a pay-per-use solar energy provider, among others.


Read more: Advice from this year's OECD prizewinners - Don't reinvent the wheel!



New directive on exportation of cashew nut from Ghana 15.03.2016

New directive on exportation of cashew nut from Ghana


The Minister of Trade and Industry with oversight responsibilities for trade regulations and controls under the Import and Export Law (Act 503 Section 13) of 1995 as amended in 2000, has issued the following Administrative Directive on the purchase and export of Raw Cashew Nut (RCN). 


 


Read more: Trade Ministry issues new directive on exportation of cashew nut 



ACi takes part in Earth Seed Natural Expo 14.03.2016

ACi takes part in Earth Seed Natural Expo


The African Cashew initiative (ACi), on March 7, 2016, took part in the Earth Seed Natural Expo. The Expo, which was organized by Earth Seed, was held at the Legon Botanical Gardens in Accra.


The ACi stand displayed roasted cashew nuts, cashew nut paste and Zoya (mixed grain and cashew powder) from Winker. Mim also provided dried white cashew nuts and cashew brandy for sale at the stand. Also on display was cashew honey from Cashew Trade Centre (CTC).


Other cashew products that were displayed at the ACi stand were Brandy, Gin, Wine and Jam which were derived from cashew. These products were made available to ACi by the Cocoa Research Institute, Ghana (CRIG). Hundreds of visitors thronged the stand to taste the cashew products on display, learn about cashew and also purchase the products.


ACi personnel also used the opportunity to dispel the myth surrounding eating cashew and drinking milk by demonstrating to visitors that it was harmless to do so. Cashew apples were, therefore, made available at the stand for visitors to taste.


The Natural Expo featured alternative lifestyle goods and services with the intention of educating the public on how to achieve a sustainable life in Ghana.  It, therefore, served as a platform for companies producing natural products and providing services that enhance a more natural lifestyle to promote their businesses and educate visitors.


Other exhibitors at the Expo included renewable energy providers, bio-waste companies, natural builders, natural healers, yogis, physical therapists, skin specialists, hair specialists, batik makers, organic farmers, vegan chefs and juice makers.


The Earth Seed Expo was sponsored by Relish Health Foods, supplier of health food supplements in Ghana, Point Innovate, a solar energy provider, West African Health Organisation, a promoter of traditional medicines and HABESHA.


 


 


 


 



ACi wins OECD-DAC Prize 10.03.2016

ACi wins OECD-DAC Prize

Mary Adzanyo and Helene Widmer of the African Cashew initiative (ACi), received an OECD-DAC prize in Paris on behalf of the initiative on Wednesday, March 9, 2016. ACi was among the three winners from ten finalists.


The Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) aims at promoting policies that will improve the economic and social well-being of people around the world. The OECD’s Development Assistance Committee (DAC) Prize was, therefore, instituted to acknowledge the efforts of organisations which have taken an innovative approach, instrument or mechanism beyond the pilot phase to wider application. The award event is organized to appreciate projects which improve the lives of people and also bridge existing developmental gaps in society. The African Cashew initiative has since 2009, pursued the mission of improving the livelihood of African cashew farmers through aiding them to receive better returns for their produce.


“The African Cashew Initiative offers a problem solving approach to innovation in development. Based on a synergistic approach that combines such activities as fund matching, capacity development and the developing a national and regional stakeholder platform, this initiative has significantly increased incomes with better quality nuts and higher yields. In this case, better business has led to sustainable development.” – HE Sheikha Lubna Al Qasimi


 


In 2015 ACi and its partners saw tremendous progress towards the realization of its vision: over 400,000 farmers were fully trained on two different topics, of which 22 % were women. To date, these farmers cumulatively earn an additional net income of $120 million. Also, cashew processing in Africa increased from 3% to about 10% since the beginning of the project in 2009. About 5,800 direct employments were created in the processing factories alone; women were the biggest beneficiaries taking up 75% of the total number of jobs created with accumulated wages of US$ 3.6 million in all 5 project countries.


 


Some congratulatory messages from partners and well wishers...


 “This initiative has impressive results in a tree crop which is an important source of income to smallholder farmers in half a dozen African countries, but which has been plagued by poor yields and quality, and weak market power of the primary producers. I like the initiative’s methodical approach to improving training and planting materials for better yields and quality, combined with building up farmer associations and establishing processing factories to capture more of the value for farmers.” – Geoffrey Lamb


“Well deserved ! so much effort gone in by all – importantly now a meaningful impact on the cashew beneficiaries – bringing an unknown sector to the forefront.” 


Chris Brett (OLAM)


 


 “…ACi indeed is a winning team. Proud to be a part of this winning team from the very beginning. I would like to say thanks to all especially to Rita for her endless efforts and leadership in making this a real success…” 


Shakti Pal (TNS-GHANA)


 


"What wonderful news – congratulations to you, Rita, for overcoming all the difficulties at the beginning of the programme, and to the entire team. ACi deserves the prize – for its creativity and commitment to the smallholders of Africa!..."


Andreas Proksch,Director General - Global and Sectoral Programmes,(Internationale Zusammenarbeit (GIZ) GmbH)


 


"Congratulations to all of you with the well deserved price. Your work is a good example of what a longer term view of donors, companies and a dedicated team can achieve for the benefit of a sector. Thank you for that..."


 Tony Bruggink (IDH)


 


Read more: Aid Innovations Which Works (The Huffington Post)


                   The DAC Prize 2015 - Taking Development Innovation to Scale


 



ACi urges African governments to support Cashew sector 09.03.2016

ACi urges African governments to support Cashew sector

Ms. Adzanyo has encouraged African governments to develop the cashew sector in their countries, during a panel discussion on GTV.


Ms. Mary Adzanyo, Director of Private Sector Development at the African Cashew initiative (ACi), represented the project in a panel discussion in Accra on March 3, 2016 on a programme dubbed “Business Advocate” on Ghana Television. The programme provides a platform for the private sector community to articulate its concerns for the attention of relevant public officials.


Speaking on the topic “Strategic Support for the Cashew Industry: Prospects and Challenges,” Ms. Adzanyo urged African governments to treat cashew production and processing as a priority and strive to increase the competitiveness of the sector in their countries. She emphasized that the industry had great economic potential which would be beneficial to the continent as a whole.

Ms. Adzanyo stated that ACi was established to support cashew production in the sub-region and encouraged stakeholders to think globally and learn from the experiences of other countries. According to her, the creation of an enabling environment by stakeholders for public-private investment would further enhance the development of the cashew sector in African countries.


Other members of the panel were Dr. Gideon Agbley, Executive Member of the Cashew Industry Association of Ghana, Mr. Seth Osei Akoto, Deputy Director for Crops and Cashew at the Ministry of Food and Agriculture (MOFA) and Mr. Papa Kow Bartels, Director, Logistics and Value Chain at the Ministry of Trade and Industry.


Mr. Akoto and Mr. Bartels stated that their respective ministries were coordinating with stakeholders to promote the development of cashew and to enhance the efficiency of the cashew sector in Ghana.


The panel recommended the establishment of a cashew development levy to finance the industry. It also suggested that the government should allocate 2.5% to 5% of its revenue to subsidize the production of seedlings and enable purchase of processing equipment for the cashew industry.


Business Advocate: Strategic Support for the Cashew Industry



International Women’s Day 2016: Pledge for Parity 08.03.2016

International Women’s Day 2016: Pledge for Parity

As part of this year’s International Women’s Day Celebrations, ACi congratulates all women and celebrates female cashew experts such as Dr. Esther Gyedu-Akoto of CRIG, Ghana as we join in the global Pledge for Parity.


The African Cashew initiative recognizes the role of women in the development of the African cashew sector. The initiative believes that one way of ensuring gender parity is through capacity development. ACi interventions among other things focus on trainings and skills development of female farmers, processors and other female cashew experts. So far, 70, 756 female cashew farmers have ACi training on topics including Good Agricultural Practices (GAP) and harvest and post-harvest techniques.24 women have also graduated from both the first and second editions of ACi’s flagship Master Training Programme for cashew experts.


 


Women as cashew leaders: Dr. Esther Gyedu-Akoto


 “I am one who believes that I can perform excellently no matter where I am. I believe with focus, determination and hard work, I have made the best of wherever God has placed me and I believe anybody can do same.” This is the certainty by which one of the most accomplished women in the Ghanaian cashew sector lives.


Dr Esther Gyedu-Akoto studied at the University of Ghana, where she graduated in 1992 with BSc Food Science and Biochemistry. She proceeded to do her national service at the Cocoa Research Institute of Ghana (CRIG) in New Tafo-Akim in the Eastern region of Ghana. After she had finished with her national service, she became an assistant researcher in the New Product Development Unit at CRIG. Between 1997 and 2000, Dr Gyedu-Akoto studied for and obtained an MPhil in Food Science at the University of Ghana. On completion of the course, she became a Research Scientist which is the same as a Deputy Manager of the New Product Development Unit.


Dr Gyedu-Akoto’s career in the cashew sector began in 2002 when the agricultural sector in Ghana started a cashew development project and CRIG was appointed as the research wing. Dr Gyedu-Akoto was selected to be the food scientist on the cashew research team. As the food scientist on this team, she worked extensively on cashew processing, including researching into and developing new ways of processing cashew nuts and apples. Her involvement in cashew research led her to conduct more in-depth study into unexplored areas of cashew research in 2005 when she decided to continue with her education.


In 2005, Dr Esther Gyedu-Akoto enrolled in a doctorate degree programme in Food Science and Technology at the Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology (KNUST). “Researching on cocoa had become an exhausted topic and to me, it was time to sniff around for new areas of research,” she said and thus did her doctoral thesis on the production and utilization of cashew tree gum. Her study revealed that cashew gum can be used in both pharmaceutical and food industries.


After completing the doctoral study in 2009, Dr Esther Gyedu-Akoto was promoted to the position of a Senior Research Scientist. In this position, she researched further into other uses of cashew as well as good processing practices to aid the improvement of nut quality. In 2013 she was appointed as the Acting Head of the unit.


Since her appointment, Dr Gyedu-Akoto has made efforts to develop a link between research and industry. She has accomplished this through the organization of trainings for processors, her fellow researchers, business owners, agricultural extension officers, farmers and nongovernmental organizations on cashew processing. Through these trainings, she educates them on new discoveries which research has made to help improve the profitability and quality of cashew and its products.


  


Dr. Akoto in the Lab                                        Cashew products produced by Dr. Gyedu-Akoto


 


Her relentless efforts to maximize benefits from cashew have led her to produce cashew jam and juice from the cashew apple. She has also worked with her team to produce vinegar, wine, gin and brandy from cashew. The team also developed a new method of roasting cashew which gave the nuts a unique taste.


“The main problem I have had to face as a researcher and woman leader in the cashew sector and at CRIG is the domineering nature of some men. They think a woman’s views should not be taken seriously. They ridicule my ideas and don’t appreciate anything I do and accomplish,” she said.


In spite of this, Dr Esther Gyedu-Akoto stands tall and has made significant contributions to the Ghanaian cashew sector with focus, hard work and determination. To her, opposition is not a reason to give up but rather a source of motivation to spur her on.


According to Dr Gyedu-Akoto, the cashew sector is a lucrative one. However, even though many women were involved in processing cashew in Ghana, very few of them were entrepreneurs. She attributes this to a generally low level of education of women in the rural areas in Ghana. She explained that educating women would equip them with skills like account keeping and documentation of information.


“Another reason which accounts for the low number of women in the cashew sector is the non-availability of financial capital for educated women who want to venture into cashew business,” Dr Esther Gyedu-Akoto added. She suggested that supporting women with financial capital and other incentives like shelling machines could help encourage women to become entrepreneurs in the sector.


As the head of her unit, Dr Esther Gyedu-Akoto aims at creating a strong link between research and industry so that discoveries made in the laboratory would be used to improve yield, quality and profitability of cashew.


Dr. Gyedu-Akoto is a mother of two and enjoys reading motivational and religious books. She aspires to own a food processing business someday.



INRAB Publishes successes In Improved Planting Material Development 17.02.2016

INRAB Publishes successes In Improved Planting Material Development


As part of measures to curb perennial non-availability of and inaccessibility to improved planting materials and subsequently to improve cashew production in Benin, ACi through a collaborative work with the National Agricultural Research Institute of Benin (INRAB) developed and implemented an accelerated cashew improved planting material program. After 5 years of hard work and cooperation, INRAB has published some of the successes and achievements chalked by the program.


Sélection d’arbres-mères d'anacardiers performants pour la production de plants greffés au Bénin


Installation de parcs à bois d'anacardiers pour accroître la disponibilité et l’accessibilité aux greffons au Bénin


 


 



ACi at the COP21 in Paris 01.02.2016

ACi at the COP21 in Paris

Delegates from 196 countries have finally agreed on a new climate deal after two weeks of negotiations at the 21st session of the Conference of the Parties to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (COP 21) held in Paris, France.


The agreement, which is intended to help limit global warming to a maximum of 2°C, will take effect in 2020. It will however, require all signatory states to make binding nationally determined contributions- based on different levels of ambition – to mitigate climate change.


GIZ joined the German negotiating team on behalf of the Federal Ministry for Economic Cooperation and Development (BMZ); the Federal Ministry for the Environment, Nature Conservation, Building and Nuclear Safety, among others, to contribute their quota at the COP 21.


After the conference, GIZ made use of the German Pavilion – a popular meeting place at the Conference – to carry out a few engagements. Small bags of cashew nuts grown in Africa were distributed among those present. The nuts which were sponsored by BMZ with the support of the African Cashew Initiative (ACi) and its two partners, Intersnack and the Trade & Development Group (TDG), were highly appreciated.


The meeting at the German Pavilion also paved way for the German visitors to make valuable contacts and develop ideas for future projects and initiatives.


 


  


Pictures: Aldema-Bolz



"Cashew has enriched my life" ... Harison Hamidu 15.01.2016

"Cashew has enriched my life" ... Harison Hamidu

Making a Living out of Cashew farming


 

Harrison Hamidu is the owner of a 5-hectare cashew farm in Tuobodom, in the Brong Ahafo region of Ghana. In 2013, the 32-year old farmer became a beneficiary of ‘Raising Farmer Livelihoods in Ghana’, a program which was put in place by Olam Ghana to improve the livelihood of farmers.


By virtue of his membership, Mr. Hamidu has received training in the three stages of Good Agricultural Practices on cashew farms. According to him, he has derived very useful benefits from his participation in this program. Apart from experiencing an increase in yield, he has also learnt about the positive implications of pruning for his farm. Pruning does not only keep his farm clean and highly productive but also provides him with additional income as he transforms the pruned tree branches into charcoal and sells them.  


Based on the knowledge Mr. Hamidu acquired from the trainings, he decided to cultivate two hectares of grafted seedlings because they were pest-resistant and would last longer. Due to the existence of the Olam Livelihood Charter (OLC), he was provided with free grafted seedlings.


Having developed a trustworthy and beneficial relationship with Olam, Mr. Hamidu sells all his Raw Cashew Nuts (RCN) to Olam through the local farmer association. To him, the association has a better collective bargaining power since he receives a fulfilling amount for his cashew.    


Having  been forced to drop out of school due to financial constraints earlier in life, Mr. Hamidu’s success in cashew farming has presented him with the opportunity to continue from where he left off. He is ,presently, a first year BSc Administration student at the Valley View University. His income from cashew farming does not only enable him to pay for his education but also helps him pay farmhands to keep the farmwork going.


“Nothing motivates me more than cashew farming,” Mr. Hamidu said.


 


 



ACi becomes a member of the INC, the International Nut and Dried Fruit Council Foundation 15.01.2016

ACi becomes a member of the INC, the International Nut and Dried Fruit Council Foundation

African Cashew initiative’s membership to the INC, the International Nut and Dried Fruit Council Foundation has been ratified by the INC Board of Trustees.


In October 2015, Ms. Goretti Guasch, Executive Director of the INC wrote, “I’m glad to inform you that your membership has been ratified by the Board of Trustees. I thank you very much for joining the INC family. With your support we will continue to grow and service your needs better and further develop the nut and dried fruit industry. ”


The INC, International Nut and Dried Fruit Council Foundation, is an internationally recognized organization that provides information on nuts and dried fruits for Health, Nutrition, Food Safety, Statistics, Government Standards and Government regulations regarding trade barriers and trade quality standards. As part of its activities, the foundation organizes its renowned INC Congress, an annual World Nut and Dried Fruit Congress held every May.  This widely acknowledged event is open to all actors and stakeholders in the nut and dried fruit industry


With a mission to be the international source and globally recognized authority for information on nuts and dried fruits, the aims and objectives of the INC cuts across the different aspects of the value chain. These aims and objectives include:



  • To consider all aspects of production.

  • To promote, encourage and stimulate consumption worldwide

  • To support investigation and research.

  • To monitor customs duties, trade barriers and be available to advise governmental bodies on their significance

  • To coordinate and homogenize quality standards and trading terms within the framework of existing national and international bodies

  • To promote reunions and international conventions within the profession, to further goodwill and mutual understanding and to keep members advised of events and developments within the trade.


ACi is very proud to become a member of the INC and looks forward to a fruitful collaboration.


For more information on the INC, please visit their website www.nutfruit.org.


 



Faire de la filière Coton-Anacarde « la seconde mamelle de l’économie ivoirienne », prochain défi pour le DG du Conseil 07.12.2015

Faire de la filière Coton-Anacarde « la seconde mamelle de l’économie ivoirienne », prochain défi pour le DG du Conseil

Le Directeur-Général du Conseil Coton-Anacarde revient sur les actions entreprises pour parvenir à des résultats et parle des prochains défis pour la filière Coton/Anacarde.


Selon le Directeur-General du Conseil Coton/Anacarde, la Cote d’Ivoire envisage de renforcer les capacités des transformateurs locaux du cajou. En plus du cacao, la filière coton-anacarde participe à hauteur de 5% de la richesse nationale. Dans les deux années à venir, la filière va contribuer  à 10% de la richesse nationale . A cet effet un projet de transformation de l’anacarde est prévu l’année prochaine. Pour ce qui est des équipements pour booster la transformation, le transfert  de ceux-ci sera assuré entre une Université en Asie et l’Institut national polytechnique Houphouët Boigny.


 En savoir plus: 


Faire de la filière Coton-Anacarde « la seconde mamelle de l’économie ivoirienne », prochain défi pour le DG du Conseil



Training in Beekeeping 07.12.2015

Training in Beekeeping

The Cashew Trade Center (CTC) will this month organize training for cashew farmers interested in beekeeping.


The beekeeping training comes after several cashew farmers revealed interest in a similar training programme organized last year.


 This year’s two day theoretical training takes place on Monday December, 7 and Tuesday December 8, 2015.


The proposed date for practical training is Wednesday 20 January 2016. The venue for the training is the C.T.C Training center in Wenchi in the Brong Ahafo Region. Participants who wish to take part in the training programme will be required to pay an amount of 50 Ghana Cedis (lunch inclusive).  


Additionally, C.T.C has released the price list for beekeeping equipment for the upcoming farming season. 


 


Beekeeping Equipment Price List: 


 


For more information please email ctcghana@gmail.com  or call 00233243672292/00233543404935


 


 



ACi/GIZ to Mark WORLD AIDS DAY on December 1. 01.12.2015

ACi/GIZ to Mark WORLD AIDS DAY on December 1.

Every year on the 1st of December, people all over the world come together to celebrate World Aids Day. It is a day to raise awareness about the issues surrounding HIV and AIDS, to show support for people living with HIV and to commemorate people who have


The World Aids Day is the first ever global health day and held in 1988 for the first time.


To commemorate the day, staff of all GIZ projects, including team members of African Cashew initiative embarked on a health walk along some principal streets in Ghana’s capital Accra, as a sign of support in the fight against HIV/AIDS. Our Theme is: “Walking towards zero”. The walk will be crowned with a Drama on HIV/AIDS and a Testimony from a person living with HIV at the GDC House in Accra.  


In the same light, the government of Ghana and people of Ghana will also join the rest of the world to mark the global day against the fight of HIV/AIDS. The commemorative national durbar will be addressed by His Excellency, John Dramani Mahama, President of the Republic of Ghana and Chair of the Ghana AIDS Commission.


This year’s World AIDS Day (WAD) will be observed through a National Durbar at the Jubilee Park, Sunyani in the Brong Ahafo Region, Ghana’s main cashew growing region. The theme for this year is “Fast Truck: Meeting the Health Needs of Children towards an HIV-Free Generation”.


Among the activities earmarked for the celebration are a series of advocacy, media and community related activities, culminating in the Grand Durbar. The aim of World AIDS Day is to encourage all Ghanaians to be aware of HIV, to take action to reduce the transmission of HIV by promoting safe sex practices and to ensure that people living with HIV can participate fully in the life of the communities, free from stigma and discrimination.



FARMERS’ DAY CELEBRATION 01.12.2015

FARMERS’ DAY CELEBRATION

This year’s Farmers’ Day celebration, scheduled for December 4, 2015 is to be held in Bolgatanga in the Upper East region of Ghana.


Farmers’ Day in Ghana is celebrated to recognize the vital role farmers and fishers play in the economy and to motivate them to produce more. The celebration of this day was instituted by the Ghanaian government in 1985, following the highly commendable output of farmers and fishermen in 1984, after the bad agricultural output in 1982 and 1983.


Each year, Ghana’s best farmer or fisher is being awarded. The value of gifts given to the best farmer has gradually improved from two machetes, a pair of Wellington boots and a pre-set radio in 1986 to tractors, pick-ups and a 3-bedroom house in recent times.


According to the Ministry of Food and Agriculture, the criteria a farmer or fisher has to meet to be selected as an award candidate include his or her knowledge of diversification and integrated farming operations, scale of operation, adoption of new technology and records keeping.


The African Cashew initiative (ACi / GIZ) has so far trained more than 40,000 cashew farmers in Ghana on Good Agricultural Practices, Harvest and Post-Harvest Handlings as well as the Establishment of Cashew Plantations. The objective is to increase cashew yields, better quality and to get the maximum farm returns that attract higher prices and increase farmer incomes.


What has ACi done on integrated farming operations? Through partnerships under the Cashew Matching Fund, farmers were trained on how to effectively combine bee-keeping and cashew farming. One impressive achievement is the increased revenue and yield from bee pollination in cashew farms. Money from honey product sales served as another source of revenue to the farmers. Especially women profit from bee-keeping activities.


Other ACi achievements through the Cashew Matching Fund in Ghana are the provision of improved planting materials to farmers, the expansion of cashew farms and the successful training of farmers on farm record keeping. ACi also supports research activities on improved planting material development in cooperation with the Ministry of Food and Agriculture, the Cocoa Research Institute, Ghana, as well as a private nursery operator named Tree Global.


Cashew is becoming a very important and more prominent cash crop in Ghana. Therefore, ACi works to equip farmers with the relevant knowledge, skills and technologies to tap into the many potentials of cashew farming.


The African Cashew wishes all farmers a Happy Farmers’ day.



Les coopératives de producteurs de noix d’anacarde se muent en association 26.11.2015

Les coopératives de producteurs de noix d’anacarde se muent en association

L’Association Nationale des Coopératives et Producteurs d’Anacardes du Togo (ANCPA-TOGO) a été portée sur les fonts baptismaux le 19 novembre à Sokodé avec l’appui technique du service de Coopération allemande (GIZ).


Ce regroupement est indispensable dans la promotion de la filière anacarde au Togo. L’association devra défendre les intérêts de ses membres, faciliter leur accès aux intrants, aux crédits et d’autres ressources de productivité, de former les membres sur les bonnes pratiques agricoles de production, de récolte, de collecte, de stockage et de commercialisation. L’association compte œuvrer pour la fixation d’un prix compétitif national en vue de la relance du secteur anacarde.


Les coopératives de producteurs de noix d’anacarde se muent en association


En savoir plus sur la filière anacarde au Togo:


Analyse de la filière anacarde au Togo



La 7e conférence internationale de la noix de cajou au Vietnam 26.11.2015

La 7e conférence internationale de la noix de cajou au Vietnam

La 7e conférence internationale de la noix de cajou ​a eu lieu le 23 novembre à Hô Chi Minh-Ville, avec la participation de 300 entreprises dont 65% venues d’une trentaine de pays étrangers​.


Étaient notamment présents des représentants de l'Association des industries alimentaires (AFI), ​du Conseil du coton et de l'anacarde (CCA) de la Côte-d'Ivoire, du Conseil tanzanien de la noix de cajou (CBT) et d’autres associations de la noix de cajou du Nigéria, de Tanzanie, de Côte-d'Ivoire, etc.


Lors de ​cette conférence intitulée "La noix de cajou du Vietnam s’oriente vers une production plus propre", l’Association de la noix de cajou du Vietnam (VINACAS) a présenté des réalisations remarquables obtenues par ce secteur du Vietnam de même que ses orientations de développement futures.


La 7e conférence internationale de la noix de cajou au Vietnam


 



Célébration des réalisations conjointes dans le secteur du cajou: Un atelier de restitution sur les activités du cajou au Burkina Faso. 25.11.2015

Célébration des réalisations conjointes dans le secteur du cajou: Un atelier de restitution sur les activités du cajou au Burkina Faso.


Depuis son début en 2009, iCA et ses partenaires travaillent à promouvoir un secteur du cajou africain durable pour la réduction de la pauvreté, avec des interventions axées sur quatre principaux domaines : La production, la transformation, l’établissement des liens d’affaires, et l’analyse du secteur. L’iCA et ses partenaires peuvent déjà célébrer un bon nombre de réalisations.


Dans le domaine de la production, iCA et ses partenaires travaillent à promouvoir le revenu des producteurs en augmentant la productivité à travers des formations sur les bonnes pratiques agricoles, Récoltes et Post-récoltes, La gestion des cultures et l’établissement de nouveau vergers. A ce jour, 387 181 producteurs ont reçu au moins deux formations, et    116 113 autres ont été formés sur un seul thème. Hors mis ce nombre, 45 118 producteurs entièrement formés et 10 512 de producteur partiellement formés sont du Burkina Faso. Ces formations ont été faites par subvention locale avec les différentes Directions Régionales de l’Agriculture des Hauts-Bassins, des Cascades, du Sud-Ouest et avec l’Union des Groupements des Producteurs d’Anacardes de la Sissili (UGPAS) pour ce qui concerne le Centre Ouest.


Pour un accroissement durable du rendement et de la qualité des noix de cajou, iCA collabore avec les institutions de recherches telles que l’INERA et le CNSF pour développer de matériels végétal améliorés et pour faciliter des échanges de connaissances régionales. Afin d’établir une industrie de transformation viable, iCA soutien les transformateurs avec le service de développement des affaires et avec d’autres mesures de renforcement de capacités. Actuellement l’industrie de la transformation au Burkina Faso emploi en moyenne 2 050 travailleurs dont 70% de femmes.  


Dans les objectifs de sa composante 3, l’initiative aide à la création des liens d’affaires durables parmi les acteurs à travers son Fond de Contrepartie du Cajou. Cinq projets au Burkina Faso sont présentement exécutés par GEBANA, ANATRANS, INERA, CNSF et UNPA  à travers les liens d’affaires, la formation des producteurs et le développement de matériel végétal amélioré.


Au regard de l’organisation du secteur, l’initiative encourage les dialogues publics-privés dans le renforcement du secteur dans le soutien au développement de politiques et des activités dans le secteur du cajou et l’organisation de conférences nationales et régionales.


A l’approche de la fin de la  deuxième phase de l’initiative du Cajou Africain,  des évaluations internes et externes de ses activités et impacts ont été entreprises au Burkina Faso, en Côte d’ivoire et au Ghana.


Globalement le projet a été évalué avec succès et une troisième phase du projet a déjà été approuvée par  le Ministère Fédérale de l’Economie et du Développement Allemand (BMZ). Dans sa prochaine phase, iCA veut consolider son impact dans le secteur, tout en faisant une mise en échelle de son champ d’application aux autres pays de l’Afrique Caraïbe et Pacifique.  L’équipe d’évaluation a recommandé que l’initiative intensifie son soutien dans la recherche à travers le développement de matériel végétal amélioré, aussi de promouvoir la consommation locale du cajou et de ses sous produits et accroitre les échanges dans le secteur au niveau national et régional.  


Les potentiels bailleurs de fonds de la troisième phase du projet sont le Secrétariat du Groupe des États d'Afrique, des Caraïbes et du Pacifique (ACP) de l’Union Européenne et les nouveaux partenaires privés et publics existants.


Communiqué de Presse Journal, Sidwaya


Communiqué de Presse Journal, L'Observateur



A Master Training Programme on Cashew: the second edition 26.08.2015

A Master Training Programme on Cashew: the second edition

From 10th to 14th August 2015, the African Cashew initiative (ACi) together with the African Cashew Alliance (ACA), supported by the Ministry of Food and Agriculture (MOFA) and the Cocoa Research Institute of Ghana (CRIG) with funding from CORAF/WECARD/Wo


From 10th to 14th August 2015, the African Cashew initiative (ACi) together with the African Cashew Alliance (ACA), supported by the Ministry of Food and Agriculture (MOFA) and the Cocoa Research Institute of Ghana (CRIG) with funding from CORAF/WECARD/World bank held the second session of the second Master Training Programme for cashew value chain promotion. This time around, 62 participants from Benin, Burkina Faso, Côte d'Ivoire, Gambia, Ghana, Mali, Senegal, Sierra-Leone and Togo met at Tyco Hotel Sunyani in the Brong Ahafo Region - the main cashew growing region in Ghana. Working along the cashew value chain and in supporting institutions, half of the participants is employed in the public sector as trainers, policy advisors, lecturers and researchers, one third works in the private sector as farmers, processors, service providers, traders and exporters, and another third is representing NGOs or work as consultants.


 


Seven months. Three sessions. Three locations


The Master Training Programme creates a pool of experts in West Africa with in-depth knowledge on the cashew value chain. It is a unique and comprehensive training program linking theoretical knowledge with live demonstrations through expert presentations and peer learning exercises. The Master Trainers have become the nucleus for country and regional networking.


Rolled out in seven months, the Master Training Program is divided in three successive one week sessions to be held in Burkina Faso, Ghana and Côte d'Ivoire. In so called “inter-sessions”, the participants return to their host organizations to conduct field work, either individually or in groups to deepen their knowledge on a selected topic. After completion of the program, the participants become acknowledged cashew experts. They either train farmers, provide assistance to processors, or advice companies, organizations and institutions in their home countries. The Master Training Program has become a quality brand for training on cashew in the West African Cashew Sector.


One session successfully completed - two more to go!


The first session was held in May in Bobo Dioulasso, Burkina Faso and introduced the trainees to the cashew value chain concept, cashew market dynamics and training material development for cashew farming. The second session reunites all to learn and exchange on topics such as the improved planting material development, pest and disease management as well as the importance of Good Agricultural Practices. As part the participants learning journey, MOFA and CRIG experts organized a field trip to the Cashew Research Station in Wenchi and to visit Ghana’s leading cashew farmers to showcase the positive effects of applying Good Agricultural Practices (GAPs).


Seth Osei-Akoto, Deputy Director Cashew Desk, MOFA states: “We, in Ghana, are amongst the first to develop and distribute improved planting materials on a carefully planned and sustainable manner. In collaboration with CRIG, we have so far supplied at least 400,000 improved cashew grafts to farmers in the Northern, Volta and Brong Ahafo regions and we have planted 4,000 hectares of new cashew plantations.” In the sub-region, Ghana serves as a role model in cashew research and the development of improved planting materials. “Through the use of improved cashew grafts, and the adoption of other Good Agricultural Practices, Ghana has increased cashew productivity significantly. Ghanaian farmers currently reach average yields of 650 kg/ha, almost closing the yield gap with Asia where cashew production reaches up to 1200kg/ha”, states Eric Bentsil Quaye, Advisor on Agricultural Standards and Planting Material, MOFA.


At the heart of the Master Training Program are facilitators and technical experts who teach, evaluate and potentially re-design each training session according to participants’ needs. All sessions include cross-cutting issues such as climate changes, policy development and sector regulations. On the agenda are also self-reflection and perception management trainings to sensitize participants on behaviors, values and communication skills that affect learning and teaching abilities. The training contents are developed with great support and commitment from various ACi partners. They use stimulating presentations, interactive role plays and lively discussions to deliver trainings. “I believe that our success is creativity and flexibility in adapting the program to participants’ learning needs”, says Andre M. Tandjiékpon, Manager of the Master Training Program, ACi.


Graphic online: Ghana lauded for increase in cashew production



Vacancy Announcements 26.08.2015

Vacancy Announcements

The African Cashew Alliance currently have job openings for various positions.


The African Cashew Alliance(ACA) was established in 2006 as an association of African and international businesses with an interest in promoting a globally competitive African cashew industry. Today, nearly 200 member companies work under the ACA banner and represent all aspects of the cashew value chain, including producers, processors, traders, and international buyers.


There are currently a number of job openings and requests for Expressions of Interests available at ACA. Please click on one of the positions below for more information:


M&E Officer position


EOI Gender Awareness


EOI Food Safety & Quality


EOI Environmental Waste


EOI Business Advisory



Filière anacarde : Le projet Coraf pour booster le secteur et lutter contre la pauvreté 21.08.2015

Filière anacarde : Le projet Coraf pour booster le secteur et lutter contre la pauvreté

Des acteurs de la filière anacardeont procédé au « lancement du projet renforcement des capacités des acteurs de la chaîne de valeur anacarde en Afrique de l’Ouest »


Des acteurs de la filière anacarde sont en atelier à Bobo-Dioulasso dans le cadre du projet CORAF anacarde. Ils ont procédé au « lancement du projet renforcement des capacités des acteurs de la chaîne de valeur anacarde en Afrique de l’Ouest » les 18 et 19 août 2015. Financé par CORAF/ WECARD et son partenaire GIZ, ce projet entend miser sur cette filière pour combattre la pauvreté. L’Institut de l’environnement et de recherches Agricoles du Burkina Faso (INERA) est le principal partenaire technique de ce projet.


En savoir plus: Filière anacarde : Le projet Coraf pour booster le secteur et lutter contre la pauvreté



Request for Consultancy Proposals 20.08.2015

Request for Consultancy Proposals

ACA request proposals for development of an Electronic Procurement System for Cashew Raw Material


The African Cashew Alliance (ACA) in addition to other roles,  serves as a platform of information in the African value chain industry, and runs a Market Information System (MIS) to address the private and public stakeholders’ cashew marketing and policy decision making in cashew producing countries. Information collected from the MIS contributes to the development and capacity building of both private and public sector organizations.


ACA aims to improve all processes within its market information services, from data collection to dissemination, market linkages, and the delivery of information to its members and other stakeholders in the cashew sector. In this regard, the Alliance requires the services of a consultant to develop an electronic procurement system in order to improve raw cashew buying in remote communities.


For more information please click on the link below


Request for Consultancy Proposals


You can also download a PDF version of the request.



Ghana : un éventuel embargo sur les exportations d’anacarde divise producteurs et transformateurs 18.08.2015

Ghana : un éventuel embargo sur les exportations d’anacarde divise producteurs et transformateurs


Au Ghana, le torchon brûle entre les producteurs d’anacarde et les transformateurs nationaux de la noix. Ces derniers ont récemment exigé du gouvernement de placer un embargo sur les exportations de noix de cajou afin de résoudre le problème de manque de matière première auquel ils sont confrontés. Cette requête n’a pas manqué d’irriter les producteurs qui y voient une manœuvre des transformateurs de contrôler les prix et de ne pas s’aligner sur les cours internationaux de la denrée.


En savoir plus: Agence Ecofin


 



Côte d’Ivoire: la filière de la noix de cajou réalise un chiffre d’affaires de 337 milliards FCFA en 2015 27.07.2015

Côte d’Ivoire: la filière de la noix de cajou réalise un chiffre d’affaires de 337 milliards FCFA en 2015

La filière ivoirienne de l’anacarde ou de la noix de cajou a réalisé cette année, un chiffre d’affaires de 337 milliards FCFA, soit une hausse de 68% pour un accroissement de volume de l’ordre de 25%, a appris APA, jeudi soir, de source officielle.


Selon le porte-parole du gouvernement, Bruno Nabagné Koné, le Conseil des ministres délocalisé qui s’est tenu, jeudi soir, à Séguéla (Nord-Ouest) a permis au ministre de l’agriculture de faire une communication portant sur le bilan de la commercialisation de la noix de cajou.


« Le chiffre d’affaire de l’ensemble de la filière noix de cajou est passé de moins de 200 milliards de FCFA en 2013 à 337 milliards FCFA en 2015, soit une hausse de 68% pour un accroissement de volume sur la période de l’ordre de 25% », a déclaré M. Koné, soulignant que « dans le même temps les revenus distribués aux producteurs sont passés de 75 milliards de FCFA à 256 milliards de FCFA » en 2015.


En savoir plus



Ghana’s cashew potential estimated at $56 million annually 27.07.2015

Ghana’s cashew potential estimated at $56 million annually

Revenue from raw cashew nuts can earn the country an estimated amount of $56 million and that of processed nuts is estimated at $102 million


Ghana’s annual revenue from exporting raw cashew nuts is estimated at 56 million dollars, Mr Joseph Yeung, Managing Director of the Mim Cashew Processing Company, has revealed.

He said value of processed cashew kernels, which is 21 per cent of the 65,000 metric tons of the annual raw cashew produced is also expected to earn the country 102 million dollars.

Mr Yeung, disclosed this when Dr Ekwow Spio-Garbrah, Minister of Trade and Industry paid a working visit to the company’s plant site at Mim in the Asunafo North Municipality.


Read More


Cashew nuts can fetch Ghana US$56m annually


Ghana: Gov’t keen on growing cashew sector



New Secretary General of the ACP Group 05.05.2015

New Secretary General of the ACP Group

During the 100th Council Session in December 2014 in Brussels, Dr. Patrick Ignatius Gomes was appointed the new Secretary General of the ACP Group. He commenced his five-year term on 1st March, 2015.


Dr. Patrick I. Gomes is the Ambassador of Guyana to the European Union and the Kingdom of Belgium (also accredited to six other European nations), and the country’s representative to the WTO, FAO, and the International Fund for Agricultural Development (IFAD). Previously, he served as Chair of the Working Group on Future Perspectives of the ACP Group and as well as Chair of the Committee of Ambassadors, a decision-making body of the ACP Group, in 2010-2011.


In an introductory meeting with GIZ, Dr. Patrick I. Gomes highlights the importance of agricultural value chains such as cocoa and cashew for Private Sector Development, one pillar of the ACP Strategy. Andre Proksch, Member of the GIZ Executive Management Committee and Head of Africa Department emphasizes success factors of GIZ work that can support the implementation of such strategies. He talks about impact-oriented monitoring, private sector engagement, south – south cooperation and management of various partnerships. In this context, Mr. Proksch is complimenting ACi’s holistic value chain approach, a good example for income generation, job creation and private sector development in the cashew sector. He offers continuous support throughout his term at GIZ.


The ACP Secretariat intends to strengthen its collaboration with ACi/GIZ to improve the cashew value chain for economic development. The objective is to contribute to inclusive agricultural growth and to improve livelihoods for smallholders by promoting competitive agricultural value chains.



International Workers Day – More Jobs in the Cashew Sector in Africa 04.05.2015

International Workers Day – More Jobs in the Cashew Sector in Africa

Every year on the 1st of May, people all over the world celebrate the International Labor Day to reflect on the challenges of workers and to look at ways of improving working conditions and promoting employment rights.


People all over the globe are plagued with the problem of unemployment and economic hardships. Today, it is no longer possible to address the issue of work without addressing the problem of unemployment.


Since 2009, the African Cashew initiative works along the cashew value chain to promote the growth of the sector and to reduce poverty sustainably. As the demand for cashews is increasing globally, the sector is expected to offer more jobs throughout the cashew value chain. So far, ACi and partner interventions have already created more than 5,500 new jobs in cashew processing factories, 75 % of them for women living in rural areas. On the production side, ACi and partners have trained more than 330,000 farmers, about 25% women, on Good Agricultural Practices. As a result  farmers are able to produce more higher quality nuts and become more profitable. Some farmer even supply specialty markets such as organic and fairtrade, thereby improving their livelihood. An increase in local production of raw cashew nuts also creates additional jobs for (seasonal) farm workers and contributes to their household income.


Sustainable Supply Chain Linkages increase revenues along the chain; Farmers, Processors, European buyers


The cashew sector has the potential to increase the income of millions of people across Africa and to provide jobs to a lot more, if processing of raw cashew nuts is done in-country. A study conducted by the Ivorian Cotton and Cashew Council estimates that 100,000 MT of additional in-country processing capacity create 12,300 factory jobs, mainly for women, and 10,000 jobs in the production and marketing sectors. ACi and partners currently provide selected processors with technical assistance and business development services to improve working conditions in their factories and to ensure high quality of their processed nuts. The initiative also encourages the training of factory workers to ensure efficiency, to increase processing capacities and to become more competitive on the global market.


The cashew industry has a great potential to contribute to the economic growth of cashew producing countries. As we celebrate the International Labor Day, consider investing in the cashew sector and contribute to a reduction in Africa’s unemployment and poverty rate.


African Cashews: 10 Great Reasons to invest now!



Journée Internationale des travailleurs - Plus d'emplois dans le secteur de la noix de cajou en Afrique 04.05.2015

Journée Internationale des travailleurs - Plus d'emplois dans le secteur de la noix de cajou en Afrique

Le 1er Mai de chaque année est célébré partout dans le monde comme étant la ‘’Journée internationale du travail’’, c’est un moment de réflexion sur les défis des travailleurs et une occasion d’examiner les voies et moyens en vu d’améliorer leurs condition


Le chômage est un fléau commun à tous les pays du monde et est à la base de bon nombre de difficulté économique. Aujourd’hui il n’est plus possible d’aborder la question du travail sans aborder le problème du chômage.

Depuis 2009, l'initiative du Cajou Africain (iCA) mène des actions et fonctionne tout le long de la chaîne de valeur de la noix de cajou afin de  promouvoir la croissance du secteur et de réduire durablement la pauvreté. Vu que la demande des noix de cajou est en augmentation constante et cela à l'échelle mondiale, le secteur devrait offrir plus d'emplois dans tous les secteurs de la noix de cajou. Jusqu'à présent, l’intervention de  l'iCA et de ses partenaires ont déjà permis de créer plus de 5500 nouveaux emplois dans les usines de transformation de cajou, 75% de ses emplois sont au profit des femmes vivant dans les zones rurales. Sur le plan de la production, l'iCA et ses partenaires ont formé plus de 330 000 agriculteurs, dont environ 25% sont des femmes, aux bonnes pratiques agricoles. En conséquence les agriculteurs sont capables de produire des noix de qualité plus élevés et susceptibles d’être plus rentable. Certains agriculteurs approvisionnent même les marchés spécialisés tels que les marchés bio et équitable, ce qui leur permet ainsi d’améliorer leurs moyens de subsistance. L’augmentation de la production locale de noix de cajou brutes crée aussi des emplois supplémentaires pour les travailleurs agricoles(les saisonniers) et contribue au revenu de leur ménage.

Les liens de chaîne d’approvisionnement durable augmentent le revenu le long de la chaîne; Producteurs, Transformateurs, Acheteurs Européens.

Le secteur de la noix de cajou a la potentialité d'augmenter le revenu de millions de personnes à travers l'Afrique et  de fournir des milliers d’emplois si une plus grande  transformation des noix de cajou brute se faisais dans les pays producteurs. Une étude menée par le Conseil de coton et de l’anacarde ivoirien à estimer que  en augmentant la capacité de traitement de 100 000 tonnes dans le pays cela permettrai de créer 12 300 emplois en usine, principalement pour les femmes, et 10 000 emplois dans les secteurs de production et de commercialisation. L’iCA et ses partenaires fournissent  actuellement des services d’assistance techniques et de développement des affaires à des unités de transformation sélectionnés en vu d’améliorer les conditions de travail dans leurs usines et pour assuré la qualité des noix de cajou transformées. L'initiative encourage également la formation des travailleurs des usines afin d’assurer leur efficacité,  en vu de l'augmentation des capacités de traitement, mais aussi pour les rendre plus compétitif sur le plan internationale.


L'industrie de la noix de cajou a un grand potentiel et peut contribuer à la croissance économique des pays dans lesquels il est produit. Alors que nous célébrons la Journée internationale du travail, envisagé investir dans le secteur de la noix de cajou et contribuer ainsi à la réduction du taux de chômage et de pauvreté en Afrique.

La Noix de cajou africaine: 10 bonnes raisons d'investir maintenant!



Cashew talks at World Bank 20.04.2015

Cashew talks at World Bank

The African Cashew initiative (ACi) and the Cotton Cashew Council (CCA) presented a case study on Development Challenges in the African Cashew Sector at the Spring Meeting 2015 held by World Bank and IMF, 17th - 19th April in Washington D.C., US.


In the frame of the Global Delivery Initiative (GDI) – a partnership for doing delivery differently – The Deutsche Gesellschaft für Internationale Zusammenarbeit (GIZ) GmbH and the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation had been invited to share their experiences in the African Cashew Sector. As panelists at the Spring Meeting 2015, ACi Executive Director, Rita Weidinger and the General Director of CCA, Malamine Sanogo addressed delivery challenges along the cashew value chain in the areas of cashew production, processing, supply chain linkages and sector organization. Moreover, the case study informs about innovative approaches tackling these challenges and identifies important factors enabling science of delivery approaches.


Already in December ACi/GIZ had participated in a World Bank event on the Global Delivery Initiative in Berlin. The GDI aims at improving results and impacts of development efforts worldwide, based on a more systematic understanding of what works in international development, why and most importantly, how.


The Global Delivery Initiative Case Study on ACi will be available for download very soon.



Cashew at SARA 2015 - The most profitable nut in Côte d’Ivoire 16.04.2015

Cashew at SARA 2015 - The most profitable nut in Côte d’Ivoire

From 3rd to 12th April, the Salon international de l ’agriculture et des ressources animales d’Abidjan (SARA 2015) was held in Côte d’Ivoire.


"The success of Côte d’Ivoire is based on agriculture.” - A famous saying in Côte d’Ivoire. Since independence the agriculture sector accounts for 30% of the GDP and 70% of export earnings, providing jobs for more than 60% of the people. Côte d’Ivoire is the main cocoa and cola nut producer in the world, the largest latex and bananas producer in Africa and the biggest exporter of cashew nuts in the world. More than ever, Côte d’Ivoire remains a land of invaluable agricultural potential.


Promoting the wealth of natural resources, Ivorian authorities re-launched SARA 2015 the Agriculture and the Animal Resources Fair (Le Salon de l’Agriculture et des Ressources Animales). More than 600 national and international exhibitors, among others the African Cashew initiative, and over 160,000 visitors were attracted by this event. As part of the closing ceremony, the Prime Minister and the Agricultural Minister presented an award to GIZ Country Director, Dr. Michael Dreyer, to acknowledge the high quality support by national and regional GIZ projects to the development of the agricultural sector.


Among the success stories of Côte d’Ivoire is their emerging cashew industry. Côte d’Ivoire is Africa’s leading cashew producer and the second largest grower of cashew worldwide. Today, more than 600,000 farmers in Côte d’Ivoire are growing cashew. However, until today only 40,000 MT of the 560,000 MT locally grown raw cashew nuts are also processed in-country. That must change! In a structural reform process in 2013, the Ivorian government, through the Cotton and Cashew Council, successfully strategized cashew activities to actively promote local investment as part of the transformation process of the Ivorian cashew industry. Following the reforms, a training center for cashew processing and technology in Yamoussoukro is being build. Also strategies to increase local cashew processing and to create employment for the rural population are being implemented. Côte d’Ivoire presents a role-model for the neighboring cashew growing countries.


Through events such as SARA 2015 and the SIETTA 2014 - Salon International des Equipements et des Technologies de Transformation de l’Anacarde, the Ivorian government facilitates knowledge and technology transfer not only on national but also on regional and international level.  By establishing regional networks of technical expertise and political cooperation, African products such as cashew have a real opportunity to become more competitive on the international market.


Read more here on the award presented to GIZ (in German only)



Unlearning to re-learn: The EDP experience 08.04.2015

Unlearning to re-learn: The EDP experience

An exciting and unforgettable experience of living with smallholder cashew farmers in rural Ghana


From the 8th to 14th February 2015, the African Cashew initiative (ACi) and the Exposure and Dialogue Association, organized a Programme on ‘Social and Economic Impulses through the Cashew Industry in Ghana’. For three days and three nights, nine high level decision makers and ACi partners experienced the everyday life of cashew farming families in Ghana. Travelling from Africa, Europe and the Caribbean, the participants were excited to spend a few days in the major cashew producing region – the Brong Ahafo Region. Some participants were eager to share their interesting experiences and cherished moments working as cashew farmers.


Wim Schipper, Sourcing Manager, Intersnack 


“My host family - Peter, Emma and their four daughters - live in the small village Sebereni in the Jaman South district. Sebereni is located in the Western part of the Brong Ahafo Region, near the Ivorian border. Decades ago Peter’s ancestors arrived here when looking for arable land. They settled as farmers and founded Sebereni. Many people who live here are family members of Peter.


Peter and Emma own six different plots of land of about 28 hectares in and around Sebereni. Next to cashew they also grow mango, papaya, yam, cassava, eggplant, oranges and plantain. While selling the raw cashew nuts (RCN) to Olam agents, they eat the fruits and vegetables they grow or sell the extras on the Drobo market.


Peter and Emma keep 34 bee hives around the cashew plantation to increase their income from cashew and by-product sales. Through pollination of the trees yields have increased from 16,500kg of RCN in 2014 to 20,000 kg of RCN in 2015. The bees also provide honey that can be sold on the market.


Peter benefitted from trainings by the African Cashew initiative (ACi) through the Ministry of Food and Agriculture. The training helped him to prioritize the necessary Good Agricultural Practices (GAPs). He thinks that it is impossible to implement all. Peter and Emma hire labourers from Sebereni and neighbouring villages to help on the farm. Due to the high yields, they can offer employment to day laborers. They are mostly women and given a chance to earn their own incomes. The use of mechanized tools such as sprayers and chain saws is costly. Physical, hands-on work is still the most common approach.


In discussions with Peter, I tried to assess the yield. We arrived at about 900 kg per hectare, which is 7 kg per tree. This is 10% above the Ghanaian average of 800 kg per hectare - the highest in Africa. Guinea Bissau is second with approximately 550 kg per hectare. Comparing these yields to Vietnam and India, Africa still has a lot to do! In my opinion, the yield gap can only be bridged with the help of mechanization. More machines and tools are needed to prepare and make lands available and to implement the fruitful Good Agricultural Practices!”


Bas van den Brink, Program Manager, IDH


“The Exposure Programme was a deep dive into reality. It was a unique experience to work and live alongside a cashew farmer and to experience their real life challenges and opportunities at first hand.  The warm welcome and openness from my host family, the community and the facilitator enabled me to be part of their lives. What touched me most was the passion for the product - cashew, the entrepreneurship and local leadership within the farming community. With the support of the African Cashew initiative great steps have been made. The results are there, new opportunities are in reach.  Thank you again for this experience.”


 


 


 



Press Release: Côte d’Ivoire - A Role Model for the Cashew Sector 31.03.2015

Press Release: Côte d’Ivoire - A Role Model for the Cashew Sector

On March 30th 2015, the African Cashew initiative (ACi) is holding its bi-annual Core Partner Meeting in Abidjan. Already the second time, the meeting is hosted by the Ivorian Cotton and Cashew Council.


One discussion point of the meeting is the cashew sector reform that took effect in 2013/14. “Côte d’Ivoire is a role model for the cashew industry, especially within West Africa”, states Rita Weidinger, Executive Director, ACi. “With support of the national government, the Cotton and Cashew Council developed a national cashew strategy to organize national actors and to coordinate sector activities”, she adds. ACi Core Partners from Africa, Europe and the US travel to Abidjan to discuss the extent to which the cashew sector reform has been implemented with focus on investments in local cashew processing and the overall growth of the industry.


Also on the agenda are discussions around a prospective ACi Phase 3 from April 2016 onwards. As a factor for success, ACi continues to rely on strategic guidance from the private and public sector partners to align project activities with industry and partner needs. Represented at this Core Partner meeting are representatives of the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, the Ivorian Cotton and Cashew Council (CCA), the African Cashew Alliance (ACA), the Mozambican Cashew Training institute (INCAJU), the Dutch-based Sustainable Trade initiative (IDH) as well as the Trade and Development Group (TDG), the German Software developer SAP AG and international cashew buyers Intersnack, KraftFoods and Olam, as well as ACi implementing Partners FairMatch Support and TechnoServe.


The Ivorian Cashew Sector at a glance


Côte d’Ivoire is Africa’s leading cashew producer and the second largest grower of cashew worldwide. Africa accounts for almost 50 % of the global cashew production, out of which Côte d’Ivoire currently produces 26 %. Today, 600,000 farmers in Côte d’Ivoire are growing cashew. However, only 40,000 MT of the 560,000 MT of raw cashew nuts produced are also processed locally. Increasing processing rates from currently 7 % to 35 % not only adds economic value for Côte d’Ivoire, but also creates employment for the rural population. A study conducted by CCA revealed that every 100,000 MT of additional processing capacity create 12,300 factory jobs, mostly for women, and extra 10,000 jobs on the production and marketing side.  


The African Cashew initiative


The African Cashew initiative is a multi-stakeholder partnership project funded by the German Federal Ministry for Economic Cooperation and Development and the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation. In close cooperation with private companies and public institutions in Benin, Burkina Faso, Côte d’Ivoire, Ghana and Mozambique ACi works along the entire cashew value chain. GIZ – Deutsche Gesellschaft fuer internationale Zusammenarbeit GmbH is the led implementer and partners with Fairmatch Support and TechnoServe to ensure a sustainable growth of cashew production and processing in Africa. Important cooperation partners in Côte d’Ivoire are the Conseil du Coton et de l’Anacarde (CCA), GIZ projects such as ProFIAB, the national training center INADES, the extension service provider ANADER, as well as the agricultural research center CNRA and FIRCA, national and international processors such as Olam, national cashew actor association for example GIC-CI, ANAPROCAJOU and FICAJOU and last but not least traders and exporters UNABO, OAPACI and AEC-CI.


 


For more information, please contact:


Mr. Karim Berthe, Coordonnateur Général, karimberthe@conseilcotonanacarde.ci


Ann-Christin Berger, ACi Communication Manager, ann-christin.berger@giz.de



Communiqué de presse: Côte d'Ivoire - Un bon modèle pour le secteur du cajou 31.03.2015

Communiqué de presse: Côte d'Ivoire - Un bon modèle pour le secteur du cajou

L’initiative du Cajou Africain (iCA) tient sa réunion biannuelle avec ses principaux partenaires, le 30 Mars 2015, à Abidjan. Cette réunion qui en est à sa deuxième édition, est organisée par le Conseil du Coton et de l'Anacarde ivoirien(CCA).


Le principal point de discussion de cette réunion portera sur les réformes entreprises dans le secteur du cajou depuis 2013/14. "La Côte d'Ivoire est un bon modèle pour l'industrie du cajou, particulièrement en Afrique de l'Ouest"  affirme Rita Weidinger, la Directrice exécutive d'iCA. "Avec le soutien du gouvernement national, le Conseil du Coton et de l'Anacarde a élaboré une stratégie nationale de développement du cajou dans le but d'organiser les acteurs nationaux et de coordonner les activités du secteur", ajoute-elle. Les principaux partenaires   d'iCA qui viennent de l'Afrique, de l'Europe et des Etats-Unis se déplacent sur Abidjan dans le but de discuter des mesures dans lesquelles la réforme du secteur a été mise en œuvre en mettant l'accent sur les investissements portant sur la transformation locale de la noix de cajou et la croissance globale de l'industrie.


Des discussions sur la troisième phase  de mise en œuvre du projet prévue  pour commencer en Avril 2016 figure également  à l'ordre du jour. Comme  facteur de succès, l'iCA continue d’appuyer les directive stratégiques des partenaires des secteurs privés et public pour faire correspondre les activités du projet aux besoins de l'industrie et des partenaires. Seront présent à cette réunion de base les représentants de la Fondation Bill & Melinda Gates, le Conseil du Coton et de l'Anacarde ivoirien (CCA), l’Alliance du Cajou Africain (ACA), l'Institut de formation du cajou du Mozambique (INCAJU), l'initiative du commerce durable Néerlandais (IDH) ainsi que le groupe de commerce et de développement (TDG), le développeur allemand de logiciels SAP AG et les acheteurs internationales de noix de cajou, Intersnack, kraftfoods et Olam, ainsi que les partenaires de mise en œuvre  d'iCA, FairMatch Support et TechnoServe.


 


Le Secteur du Cajou Ivoirien en bref


La Côte d'Ivoire est le premier producteur de noix de cajou en Afrique et le deuxième plus grand producteur de noix de cajou dans le monde entier. L'Afrique représente près de 50% de la production mondiale de noix de cajou, dont 26% est actuellement produite par la Côte d'Ivoire.  Aujourd'hui, 600 000 agriculteurs en Côte d'Ivoire cultivent du cajou. Cependant, seulement 40 000 MT sur les 560 000 tonnes de noix de cajou brutes produites sont transformés localement. L'augmentation des taux de transformation qui est actuellement de 7% à 35% ajoutera non seulement de la valeur économique pour la Côte d'Ivoire, mais créera aussi des emplois pour la population rurale. Une étude menée par le CCA a révélé que 100 000 tonnes de capacité de transformation supplémentaire crée 12 300 emplois en usine, principalement pour les femmes, et 10 000 emplois supplémentaires sur le plan de la production et de la commercialisation.  


L'initiative du cajou africain


L'initiative du cajou africain est un projet de partenariat multipartite financé par le ministère fédéral allemand de la Coopération économique et de développement ainsi que par la Fondation de Bill & Melinda Gates. En étroite collaboration avec des entreprises privées et des institutions publiques du Bénin, du Burkina Faso, de la Côte d'Ivoire, du  Ghana et  du Mozambique, iCA fonctionne tout le long de la chaîne de valeur du cajou. GIZ - Deutsche Gesellschaft fuer Internationale Zusammenarbeit GmbH est l'exécutant du projet en partenariat avec FairMatch Support et TechnoServe pour assurer une croissance durable de la production du cajou et sa transformation en Afrique. Les partenaires Importants de la coopération en Côte d'Ivoire sont: le Conseil du Coton et de l'Anacarde (CCA), les projets de la GIZ tels que ProFIAB, le centre national de formation INADES, le fournisseur des services de vulgarisation ANADER, ainsi que le centre de recherche agricole CNRA et FIRCA , les transformateurs nationaux et internationaux tels que Olam, les associations nationales des acteurs du secteur du cajou, par exemple CPG-CI, ANAPROCAJOU et FICAJOU et aussi les commerçants et les exportateurs UNABO, OAPACI et AEC-CI.


 


Pour plus d'informations, veuillez contacter:


Mr. Karim Berthe, Coordonnateur Général, karimberthe@conseilcotonanacarde.ci


Ann-Christin Berger, Responsable de Communication de iCA, ann-christin.berger@giz.de



INTERNATIONAL DAY OF FORESTS – MITIGATING CLIMATE CHANGE, ONE CASHEW TREE AT A TIME 26.03.2015

INTERNATIONAL DAY OF FORESTS – MITIGATING CLIMATE CHANGE, ONE CASHEW TREE AT A TIME

ACi encourages everyone to mark this year’s International Day of Forests by planting a cashew seedling. The time to act is now!


The International Day of Forests, instituted by the United Nations General Assembly in 2012, is celebrated every year on March 21st to raise awareness on the importance of all tree types. ‘Forests and Climate Change’ as this year’s theme, highlights mitigating and adapting to climate change as well as linking forests and sustainable development. Tree crops, such as cashew, are a source of income for many people around the world. Cashew especially, has diverse economic benefits, from the cashew nut and shell to the cashew apple. 


The cashew tree is very robust and even grows and yields well in harsh, meaning dry climatic conditions with low rainfalls and thus lower soil fertility. A study revealed the potential for cashew growing areas, even if climate change continues at the same pace. The study forecasts that by 2020, and even more by 2050, areas that are currently suitable for cocoa will become much more suitable for cashew. Cocoa compared to cashew needs higher levels of rainfall and better soil conditions. Cashew trees also serve as a great habitat for bees, thereby promoting biodiversity in the plantations. Farmers introducing bees on their farms experienced up to three times higher yields due to pollination. In tropical countries, the canopies of cashew trees provide shade from the sun and help reduce erosion. Planting cashew also reduces the impacts of climate change by preventing deforestation and helps to protect, conserve and restore the soils.


ACi Partners, through the Matching Fund and a collaborative effort, have been able to support the production of 2.2 improved cashew seedlings and distributed them to 29.138 ha of new cashew plantations. This is part of the objectives to improve the genetic material for high yielding trees and high quality African cashews and to ultimately accelerate the development of the cashew industry.


African Cashew  initiative (ACi), being confident about the benefits of cashew trees, organized a tree planting exercise in August, 2014 together with other industry players, at the botanical gardens of the University of Ghana. The aim is to revive the Legon botanical gardens and to encourage people to take responsibility for a greener urban area. Join ACi to preserve our forests by planting cashew today. You will be glad you did.


You can read about ACi’s interventions here:


ACi Tree Planting Exercise


Climate Change Study - Powerpoint Presentation


Climate Change Study - Report


Bee Keeping Study


Bee Keeping Success Story


Improved Planting Material 


 



Raw Cashew Nut Price is set for 2015 season. 18.03.2015

Raw Cashew Nut Price is set for 2015 season.

The pricing committee of the Ghana Cashew Industry Association has set the starting price for RCN at GH¢ 2.70 for this year’s cashew season.


A stakeholder committee comprising of farmers/producers, processors, traders/buyers and exporters met in Techiman at the beginning of the month to deliberate and come up with a starting price for the 2015 cashew season in Ghana. With the Ministry of Food and Agriculture as the facilitator, the committee which is known as the pricing committee has come up with the price to help regulate the sector and make it more competitive for actors.


Read More: Minimum price for raw cashew nuts announced



World Consumer Rights Day 2015 16.03.2015

World Consumer Rights Day 2015

As part of this year’s World Consumer Rights Day, ACi entreats all consumers to try the highly nutritious and healthy African cashew nuts, grown and processed in Africa.


Every year, 15th March is set aside to celebrate World Consumer Rights Day (WCRD). This year’s theme is ‘healthy diets’. The WCRD is organized by Consumer’s International to increase awareness on the basic rights of consumers and to demand that these rights are respected. Eating highly nutritious local foods, reducing the content of salt and sugar in processed foods and placing nutrition labeling on consumer foods are some of the ways of respecting the consumer rights. Unhealthy diets are associated with four of the ten most significant causes of diseases such as obesity, high cholesterol, high blood pressure and high blood glucose.


The African Cashew initiative (ACi) believes that one way of eating healthy is to include cashew nuts in diets. Not only are cashew nuts delicious but contain monosaturated fats which are good for diabetic patients. Eating cashew nuts reduces the risk of cardiovascular and coronary heart diseases. The nuts are also high in magnesium which is essential for healthy bones. Inadequate magnesium can lead to high blood pressure, headaches, muscle cramps and tiredness. An added bonus is that eating cashew nuts reduces the chances of gaining weight.


The cashew apples are also rich in nutrients and contain about 5 times of the Vitamin C found in oranges and about 12 times found in pineapples. The apples aid in the growth and repair of tissues in the body, help prevent cholera and cure diarrhoea. Although often thrown away, the cashew apples can be processed into chutneys, jams, candies, alcoholic and non-alcoholic beverages and syrups. So, both the cashew nut and apple offers great business opportunities for investors; are delicious treats and have a wide range of health benefits.


As we celebrate World Consumer Rights Day, don’t forget to include cashew in your diet. Your body will thank you. 



Impressions of a Cashew Master Trainer - A talk about personal and professional changes 11.03.2015

Impressions of a Cashew Master Trainer - A talk about personal and professional changes

In anticipation of the second edition of the Master Training Programme (MTP), Eloi Nombre, a cashew Master trainer in Burkina Faso, shares his experiences since the MTP first edition.


“My name is Eloi Nombre. I am the General Secretary of the Cashew producers union of Burkina Faso (UNPA/BF). I took part in the Cashew Master Training Programme which was organized last year by ACi. I learnt a lot from the programme and have been working to transfer the knowledge I gained since then.”


 


“Since the first edition of the MTP, I have trained 25 trainers. Using the training tools that were introduced to us at the first edition, I have succeeded in training a lot of farmers as well. I am able to structure the trainings according to an objective and to sustain the interest of the group receiving the training. Moreover, as farmers have very little knowledge about processing and what RCN are used for, I explained the processes involved in processing to them. Farmers find this very interesting as they begin to appreciate their role in the value chain. They also realize that in practicing GAPs they contribute to the overall quality assurance of cashew kernels, which is the end product. ”


 


“Some of the training topics I have taught are top working, grafting and pest and disease management. For most of the farmers, it was their first time of hearing about top working. Others did not also know that it is not advisable to intercrop cashew with pigeon peas or cowpeas. I also trained them on different classification of pesticides.”


 


“The MTP has advanced my knowledge in cashew but I have also acquired some important personal lessons such as perception management. I can say that I have personally changed a lot and I look forward to the second edition.”


“For the next coming edition, it would be fine to incorporate to the programme, the topic of negotiation techniques which will increase knowledge of farmer leaders for commercial transactions with buyers and processor.”



“Linking into the Future” 09.03.2015

“Linking into the Future”

Intersnack procurement and its partners have initiated a project in Benin to improve cashew farmers’ livelihood.


At the beginning of this year, Intersnack procurement together with Tolaro Global, Self Help Africa, DEDRAS and ACi launched a new cashew project in Parakou, in central Benin. The project aims at improving the livelihood of cashew farmers through income diversification. The project encourages cashew farmers to practice intercropping and beekeeping in addition to good agricultural farming practices. Farmers receive training to acquire the needed skills for these activities. In addition to increasing cashew yields, intercropping and beekeeping provide alternative sources of income. By selling other food crops and / or by-products such as honey and wax, farmers raise their livelihood for themselves and their families.


Read more:  “Linking into the Future” - A new project to improve the livelihood of cashew farmers in Benin



“More than just a farmer, more than just a worker....” - An EDP experience 09.03.2015

“More than just a farmer, more than just a worker....” - An EDP experience

Paula Hippolyte-Bauwens, recounts her experience in the recently organized Exposure and Dialogue Programme.


From the 8th to 14th February, 2015, ACi and the Exposure and Dialogue Programme Association organized an Exposure and Dialogue Programme on "Social and Economic Impulses through the Cashew-Industry in Ghana". Altogether, 11 participants from African, Carribean and European public and private organisations spent three days and three nights (Exposure) with cashew farmers in the Tain, Wenchi and Jaman Districts of the Brong – Ahafo Region. Following the Exposure, participants reflected on their experiences and activities they were involved in during the previous days of exposure. The programme was summed up with a Dialogue workshop with stakeholder and experts of the Ghanaina cashew sector.


Paula Hippolyte-Bauwens who is the first secretary of the Embassy of the Eastern Carribean States to Belgium and the EU, was one of the participants of this programme. She shares her experiences below:


"My experience in Tain District and in Accra during the most recent EDP/ACi programme was a life-influencing experience, as I like to describe it, because it is one of those experiences obtained within the framework of professional exercise, but which impacted me for life. The learning curve in terms of cashew production, promotion of quality and challenges faced by the cashew industry as a whole, was a steep one, which was necessary for proper comprehension of the African reality. It was also an opportunity to understand how the African Cashew Experience could also be relevant to the Caribbean in a Small Island Developing State context, which is mine.


Beyond the professional exercise, the experience I had living and working with a farmer who faces adverse conditions but who lives a life of dignity, was most extraordinary. The depth of the person also struck me – more than just a farmer, more than just a worker, their life stories were the stories of many, no matter where they grew up or which part of the world they happened to live in…I could have identified with it, the human relations, the challenges and the hopes. Of course, it was a challenge to be propelled into a different world where traditions, practices and norms seem unconnected with the fast-pace of so-called development. The frequent power cuts that plunge homes and lives into darkness until the timid light of the morning gives way to a burst of relentless heat, structure (or limits) peoples’ activities around the sunlight. However, the deep respect for the elderly and for traditional customs such as the authority of Nana or the village chief is awe-inspiring. The back-breaking farm work or household work served to remind me of the distance development has taken some of us away from poverty, yet paradoxically, too far from the bliss of hard work that produces sweet sleep at night.


For me, the cashew life experience was unforgettable: how life can be woven around the cashew farm, to the extent that the trees can take on the resemblance of one’s progeniture…and represent one’s life. Much ground has been covered by the ACi and its partners in terms of the production and promotion of good quality nuts in Ghana…there is still much distance to go, with the development of by-products and value addition. I therefore look forward to a meaningful exchange of experience between Ghana and Saint Lucia in cashew nut production and value addition."



Doing Delivery Differently - The Global Delivery Initiative 27.02.2015

Doing Delivery Differently - The Global Delivery Initiative

The Global Delivery Initiative together with GIZ and World Bank organized the Case study Marketplace on the 11th and 12th of December, 2014. ACi had the opportunity to present its unique model as a case study at the event.


GDI -a partnership for doing delivery differently.


The Global Delivery Initiative (GDI) is a partnership of development agencies and multilateral development banks, government agencies and non-governmental implementers, private sector practitioners, and the research community with an objective to improve the results and impacts of development efforts worldwide. This can be achieved by understanding the what, why and how of international development in order to improve delivery. The Initiative also aims at promoting integrated approaches of delivery by forging a global community of partners to build a more systematic, cumulative, and strategic understanding of how to deliver.


The Case Study Marketplace – the knowledge exchange platform


On the 11th and 12th of December, GDI organized the Case Study Marketplace in Berlin, to introduce Delivery Case Studies while launching the initiative. The event which was co-hosted by GIZ and the World Bank was meant to interactively explore the up and downs of project implementation and which methods were applied for learning and possible success.  GDI recognizes the need for a knowledge exchange platform, where partners can share and learn from knowledge and experiences from various sectors and regions. The Case Study Marketplace is therefore a forum to showcase the Delivery Case Studies as a way to provide partners with insights into the various delivery-based experiences and an opportunity to feed these insights back into operational settings. 12 different case studies were presented from organisations such as KfW, World Bank, GIZ, Universities as well as ACi.


ACi – the unique model


ACi presented the project as a case study at the Marketplace showcasing the comparative advantage of being a project on value chain as well as supply chain linkages with a strong incorporation of private sector views.  As a unique project that involves the private and decision making public sector into the project steering through the establishment of a body of Core Partners, ACi received special attention during the event. Participants were especially interested in the fact that national and international private partners as well as local public decision makers are sustainably taking over the “driver’s seat” in the implementation of the project.


Next steps


ACi has accepted the invitation to present a complete Science of Delivery (SoD) Case Study at the World Bank’s Spring Conference in Washington in April 2015. The main focus of the ACi SoD Case Study is directed towards underexplored complex delivery challenges. It will also focus on processes that development actors routinely grapple with; what they are, when they arise, and how they can be addressed, as well as detailed accounts on delivery techniques, strategies, and experiences of the twists and turns of the implementation process.



Apply Now! Become a Master Trainer on Cashew! 18.02.2015

Apply Now! Become a Master Trainer on Cashew!

The African Cashew initiative launched the second call for applications for its Cashew Master Training Program.


The program targets 60 participants working in the private and public sector as well as in NGO’s to promote cashew value chains in West Africa. If you are an experienced consultant or value chain expert, a trainer or researcher on cashew or any other crop, a cashew buyer or trader, working at a processing company, in government or its supporting structures with focus on cashew, we are looking for you!


Here is what you need to know about the program: The Master Training Program starts in May and covers a period of 7 - 8 months. It includes three 1-week-classroom sessions taking place in Burkina Faso, Ghana and Côte d’Ivoire respectively. Each session focuses on a specific set of technical modules along the cashew value chain. In between the classroom sessions, so-called inter-sessions or field activities of maximum three months are scheduled. During these inter-sessions, participants return to their host institutions, share their knowledge with colleagues and do hands-on work in the field to apply what they have learnt. Linking theoretical knowledge to practice, the technical modules and activities are aligned with the production, processing and marketing calendar for cashew. The training sessions are facilitated by experts in the sector and held in English and French simultaneously. Preference will be given to participants from ACi countries: Benin, Burkina Faso, Côte d’Ivoire and Ghana. However, applicants from non-ACi countries are also invited to participate and to send their applications.


 


We raised your interest? Send your application to André M. Tandjiékpon, Master Training Program Manager andre.tandjiekpon@giz.de


 


Annex 1: Application Form for MTP, Edition 2


Annex 2 : Curriculum Vitae Form


Concept Note For Master Trainer Program



Postulez dès maintenant! Devenir un Maître Formateur de cajou! 18.02.2015

Postulez dès maintenant! Devenir un Maître Formateur de cajou!

L’initiative du Cajou Africain(iCA) a lancé le deuxième appel à candidature pour le programme de formation des Maîtres Formateurs de cajou.


Le programme cible 60 participants qui travaillent dans le secteur privé et public ainsi que dans les ONG de promotion des chaînes de valeur de cajou en Afrique de l'Ouest.


Si vous êtes un consultant avec une grande expérience dans le secteur ou expert de la chaîne de valeur, un formateur ou un chercheur sur le cajou ou autres cultures, un acheteur de la noix de cajou ou commerçant, et si vous travaillez dans une entreprise de transformation, au sein du gouvernement ou de ses structures de soutien avec un accent sur les noix de cajou, alors ce programme est le votre.  


Voici ce qu'il faut savoir sur le programme: Le programme de formation de maîtres formateurs commence en Mai et a une durée de 7-8 mois. Il comprend trois sessions; 1 semaine de séances de classe qui ont lieu respectivement au Burkina Faso, au Ghana et en Côte d'Ivoire. Chaque session se concentre sur un ensemble spécifique de modules techniques tout au long de la chaîne de valeur de la noix de cajou. Entre les séances de classe, des activités sur le terrain appelées intersessions sont prévues pour un durée de trois mois au maximum. Au cours de ces intersessions, les participants retournent à leurs propre structures, pour partager les connaissances acquises avec leurs collègues et faire des travaux pratiques sur le terrain pour mettre en pratique ce qu'ils ont appris. Pour lier les connaissances théoriques à la pratique, les modules et les activités techniques correspondent aux calendriers de production, de transformation et de commercialisation des noix de cajou. Les sessions de formation sont facilitées par des experts dans le secteur, en français et à la fois en anglais. La préférence sera accordée aux participants des pays de iCA: Bénin, Burkina Faso, Côte d'Ivoire et le Ghana. Toutefois, les candidats de pays non-iCA sont également invités à participer et à envoyer leurs candidatures.


Avons-nous éveillé votre intérêt? Envoyez votre candidature à Mr. André Tandjiekpon, Chargé du programme de formation des Maitres Formateurs :  andre.tandjiekpon@giz.de
 


  Annexe 1:Formulaire de Candidature du Programme des Maitres Formateurs


Annexe 2: Formulaire de Curriculum Vitae du Programme des Maitres Formateurs


Note conceptuelle du Programme des Maitres Formateurs - Deuxième Edition



World Cashew Convention 2015, Dubai 17.02.2015

World Cashew Convention 2015, Dubai

From the 5th to 6th February, 2015, Cashew industry experts and stakeholders convened at Dubai for the World Cashew Convention.


The ACi Executive Director, Rita Weidinger, presented the sustainable supply chain model of the private-public partnership project to participants.


She also met with traders, processors, buyers and other business people especially from India and Africa, looking at possibilities of investments in increasing quantity and quality of African RCN as well as African based processing.


Cashew Week - volume 16, issue 06



Le Defi de l’industrialisation 20.01.2015

Le Defi de l’industrialisation

Anacarde connaîtra une proportion très importante favorisée par climat ivoirien dans l’avenir, au point même de rivaliser avec le Cacao et l’hévéa.


Grace aux réformes de l’état, le secteur de l’anacarde a connu un  grand progrès particulièrement au niveau de la  production. Malgré cela, il existe toujours un défi  quant à la transformation d’anacarde au Cote d’ivoire et en Afrique en générale. C’est pour cette raison que le Conseil de Coton et Anacarde a organisé le Salon International des Equipements et des Technologies de Transformation de l'Anacarde (SIETTA) pour donner aux acteurs de la filière l’opportunité d'apprendre les technologies et les tendances modernes de transformation, des opportunités d'investissement et des affaires dans le secteur et aussi de faire le réseautage avec d'autres acteurs de l'industrie.


 


En savoir plus


http://www.rti.ci/dossiers_9622_eco-plus-agriculture-filiere-anacarde-le-defi-de-l-industrialisation.html



Agrofood West Africa 2014: GIZ seminar on “Packaging and Food Safety in the Ghanaian Agriculture and Food Industry” 08.12.2014

Agrofood West Africa 2014: GIZ seminar on “Packaging and Food Safety in the Ghanaian Agriculture and Food Industry”

On the 3rd of December, 2014, GIZ organized a seminar on Packaging and Food Safety in the Ghanaian Agriculture and Food Industry, as part of activities for the just ended Agrofood West Africa 2014 which was organized from 2nd to 4th December, 2014


The  seminar which was jointly organised by three GIZ projects namely; Market Oriented Agriculture Project (MOAP), African Cashew initiative (ACi) and the Affordable Nutritious Foods for women project (ANF4W) covered topics on post-harvest handling of commodities and food products, food processing and packaging and implementing international standards in the food industry. Industry experts from organizations such as Agric Engineering Services, Blue Skies, Food and Drugs Authority, Food Research Institute of Ghana, Ghana Standard Authority, HPW, Institute for Packaging, Nestlé, Peelco Fruits, SmartCert, Traque, Unilever and Yedent made presentations and were part of a panel of discussion on featured topics. Participants from different sectors contributed with much enthusiasm to the discussion making it a successful event.


In addition, MOAP and ACi exhibited materials on their various project activities at their stand. Healthy life and the HPW fresh and dry companies also treated participants to samples of their products as they also exhibited assorted juices and drinks and dry fruits at their respective stands.


GIZ seminar on “Packaging and Food Safety in the Ghanaian Agriculture and Food Industry”


3rd International Trade Show on Agriculture & Livestock, Food, Beverage & Packaging Technology and Food, Beverages & Hospitality


 



National Farmers Day 2014 - Raising Cashew Farmer Livelihoods in Ghana 05.12.2014

National Farmers Day 2014 - Raising Cashew Farmer Livelihoods in Ghana

ACi congratulates all farmers as we celebrate this year’s National farmer’s day and continues to work towards its aim of increasing farmer incomes to achieve sustainable poverty reduction.


Through farmer trainings, and innovative programs such as the ACi cashew Matching fund and the Master Trainers program, the African Cashew initiative helps farmers in improving the quantity and quality of cashew produced and ensuring sustainable linkage throughout the value chain. Eventually, farmers’ livelihoods are improved and they benefit from their labour.


One of such farmers who have benefitted from ACi interventions is Alhaji Siaka. Alhaji lives in Bonakere, a community outside of Sampa on the border to Côte d’Ivoire. About 20 years ago, Alhaji planted his first cashew trees on a modest 5 hectares plot. Ever since he has increased his farm bit by bit. The income from his farm helped to improve his livelihood and now Alhaji is able to send his children to school.


Read about the story of Alhaji – King of cashew and also about farmer Yeboah Yesuanaa; "Cashew makes me a role model"



Promoting cashew processing and consumption in Africa; SIETTA 2014 sets the stage 04.12.2014

Promoting cashew processing and consumption in Africa; SIETTA 2014 sets the stage

The International Cashew Processing Equipment & Technology which was successfully held from the 26th to the 28th November, 2014 brought together international and local stakeholders in the cashew sector as well as businessmen and investors.


The three day event which was organized by the Cotton and Cashew Council (CCA) of Ivory Coast, under the patronage of the President of the National Assembly and in association with the Ministry of Industry and Mines and the Ministry of Agriculture provided an opportunity for stakeholders to experience and learn about cutting-edge technologies and modern trends in cashew processing, business and investment opportunities in the sector and also to network with other industry players.


At the opening ceremony the Prime minister of Ivory Coast, Daniel Kablan Duncan, noted the benefits of local cashew processing and encouraged banks and financial investors to invest in the sector while proposing that the SIETTA be organized every two years.


ACi congratulates organizers of the event, their partners, stakeholders and participants for a successful SIETTA 2014.



Promouvoir la transformation et la consommation de cajou en Afrique; SIETTA 2014 ouvre la voie 04.12.2014

Promouvoir la transformation et la consommation de cajou en Afrique; SIETTA 2014 ouvre la voie

Le salon international des équipements et des technologies de transformation de l’anacarde qui s’est déroulée avec succès du 26 au 28 Novembre, 2014 a réuni des acteurs locaux et internationaux du secteur de cajou ainsi que des hommes d'affaires et les i


L'événement qui était organisée pendant trois jours par le Conseil de coton et de la noix de cajou (CCA) de la Côte-d'Ivoire, sous le haut patronage du Président de l'Assemblée nationale et en association avec le Ministère de l'Industrie et des Mines et le ministère de l'Agriculture a permis les participants d’expérimenter et d'apprendre les technologies et les tendances modernes de transformation de cajou. Il les donnait l’occasion pour apprendre des opportunités d'investissement et des affaires dans le secteur et aussi de faire le réseautage avec d'autres acteurs de l'industrie.


Lors de la cérémonie d'ouverture, le Premier ministre, Daniel Kablan Duncan, a noté les avantages de la transformation de cajou et a encouragé les banques locales et les investisseurs financiers d’investir dans le secteur ainsi tout en proposant que le SIETTA être organisé tous les deux ans.


ACi félicite les organisateurs de l'événement, leurs partenaires, les intervenants et les participants pour la réussite de SIETTA 2014.


 


En savoir plus:


Le SIETTA 2014, pour renforcer les investissements privés autour de l’anacarde


TRANSFORMATION DE L’ANACARDE : LE SIETTA 2014 S’EST TENU DU 26 AU 28 NOVEMBRE 2014 A ABIDJAN


Le Premier ministre propose l’institutionnalisation du SIETTA



Brussels 29 October 2014 / Open Day at the African Caribbean Pacific Secretariat: 02.12.2014

Brussels 29 October 2014 / Open Day at the African Caribbean Pacific Secretariat:

The Secretariat of the African, Caribbean and Pacific Group of States invited ACP Embassies and Missions in Brussels to the “5th Open Day” organized by Department of Sustainable Economic Development and Trade held at the ACP House on 29th October, 2014


For the fifth consecutive year, the Department of Sustainable Economic Development and Trade hosted its Open Day in order to provide a forum to share the successes achieved and challenges encountered during project implementation. Furthermore, the 5th Open Day also served to inform all ACP Embassies and Missions about how their respective countries and regions have benefitted and /or can benefit from implementation of ACP projects.


This Open Day brought together representatives from ACP Embassies, Missions and Regional Organizations as well as representatives from the ACP Project Management Units and other facilities in a successful effort to strengthen partnership, identify synergies and linkages and promote an integrated approach leading to an efficient use of resources.  Beyond presentations which were structured around four clusters: (i) Trade related programmes, (ii) Agricultural Capacity building programmes, (iii) Investment and Private Sector related programmes, and (iv) Environment related programmes the ACP organized exposition stands in the reception hall. GIZ was invited to present its Commodities Programme taking the example of Cocoa in West & Central Africa in the plenary as well as exhibiting  its engagement in the hall.


ACi represented at the Open Day


After two visits to the ACP Secretariat in May and September, ACi took the opportunity to present the initiative in the context of agricultural capacity building programs during the Open Day.


At a booth, ACi and GIZ as a German Development Institution were presented to numerous visitors from Ambassies and international organisations in/for ACP countries. The value chain based concept of the African Cashew initiative in general and its cooperation with the private sector, be it in the frame of the Cashew Matching Fund or the cooperation with SAP met high interest and raised curiosity for further in-sight information.  The following manifold fruitful discussions indicate high potential for intensive cooperation with the Secretariat of the African, Caribbean and Pacific Group of States Secretariat. 


Other GIZ presentations


Information about Farmer Business Schools and background information about agricultural programs within the GIZ, also met high demand. In the frame of the programme  Agricultural Capacity Building Programmes, the ACi Executive Director, Rita Weidinger, held a presentation about the Cocoa-Food Linkage Programme West & Central Africa. This presentation gave a broad overview about the project and its approach to support the value chain development, including market access and income generation for smallholders, business services as well as business approaches and links between cocoa farming and food companies. At the end of the presentation other commodity programs including cashew nuts were demonstrated as further examples of successful GIZ cooperation in the context of sustainable value chain development.



Awarded:GIZ is awarded with a prize at the International Certification Conference 09.10.2014

Awarded:GIZ is awarded with a prize at the International Certification Conference

The International Certification Conference (ICC) took place from the 16th until the 20th of September in Yamoussoukro the capital of the Côte d’Ivoire, with over 150 participants.


The aim was, to offer a room for knowledge and experience exchange regarding the certification of agricultural products and to define a common line of approach for the future application of sustainability standards. At the conference which was organized by the Ministry for Agriculture and Trade and the Conseil du Café et Cacao, government representatives, organizations for international cooperation, producers, exporters and processors discussed on the topic of “Sustainable Agriculture: Obstacles and Perspective of Certification”.


The GIZ was as well present with some representatives who made a major contribution with their presentations about the topics sustainability and standards. With their presentation about “Certificated Sustainability: Obstacle for Small Scale Farmers or a Tool for Improved Sustainability?” Eberhard Krain from the KC Agricultural Trade and Standards and Jean Marie Coulibaly from the program rural economic development and biodiversity in the Côte d’Ivoire offered the participants an inside in the international, regional and Africa wide experiences of the GIZ with certificated sustainability. Within the presentation the results of a recent survey by the GIZ sector network for rural development in Africa (SNRD Africa) was presented. In the aftermath of the presentations Mary Adzanyo from the African Cashew initiative (ACi) had the opportunity to present the experiences of the GIZ with the certification of Cashews in West Africa during the working group sessions and thus to enrich the discussion with illustrative examples.


Obviously the quality and the content of the presentations by the GIZ experts made a great impression on the participants of the ICC. On the last day of the conference the GIZ was awarded with the “Prix ICC 2014” for the best organization. A confirmation of the excellent work on international quality the GIZ is doing in the field of sustainable certification!


 


By Sabine Diallo


GIZ



Plant a Cashew Tree - Revive Legon Botanical Garden 14.08.2014

Plant a Cashew Tree - Revive Legon Botanical Garden

On Thursday, 14th August 2014, ACi, Pine Springs and University of Ghana in cooperation with ACi partners, Ministry of Food and Agriculture, Cocoa Research institute of Ghana and Olam organised a Cashew Tree Planting event at the Legon Botanical gardens


In a nutshell, the University of Ghana gave parts of the 123 acres of Legon Botanical Gardens to Pine Springs Ltd in 2008 to develop a leisure space and to organize sensitization programs on the environment and the benefits of nature such as herbal medicine, fresh and cool air, recreation, etc. The project is planned for 35 years, which can afterwards be extended for another 15 years. As the vegetation in the park is gradually deteriorating, the University of Ghana, Pine Springs Ltd, private companies and individuals volunteered to plant over 700 trees since the beginning of 2014 until today. Recently, the Dutch Private Sector Initiative accorded a grant for rehabilitating, fencing and other essential infrastructure in the botanical garden. Also the African Cashew initiative (ACi) with its partners in Ghana, jointly work to promote cashew planting and tree productivity. In this regard, the Ministry of Food and Agriculture (MOFA) and the Cocoa Research Institute of Ghana (CRIG) have developed improved cashew varieties to increase cashew yields in Ghana to over 1 ton/ha, compared to 300-400 kg/ha on non-selected trees.


“Planting a tree, is planting a hope.” With these encouraging words, Mr. Siegfried Leffler - Country Director of the German Development Corporation (GIZ), Mr. Seth Osei-Akoto - Ministry of Food and Agriculture, Dr. Asirifi - Department of Botany, University of Ghana, Legon, Mr. Abu Dadzie - Cocoa Research Institute of Ghana and Mr. Nii Apa Ahinakwah - OLAM, followed the invitation of ACi Executive Director - Rita Weidinger and Pine Springs Ltd. Manager - Kofi Boakye Yiadom to plant cashew trees to recover the Botanical Garden at University of Ghana, Legon. In their speeches, the dignitaries highlighted the importance of improved cashew seedling development and the economic benefits of the cashew nut. Since 2009, the African Cashew initiative together with its partners has trained about 60.000 cashew farmers in Ghana. As a result, cashew households have more than doubled their income from cashew growing alone. Also, cashew processor OLAM in cooperation with CRIG and ACi distributed 82,000 improved cashew seedlings to increase cashew yields for farmers in the Brong-Ahafo Region. In this frame and to encourage individuals to take responsibility for a greener urban - and more prosperous rural – Ghana, each participant planted one cashew seedling. In total, the dignitaries, GIZ project representatives and ACi staff planted 23 cashew seedlings to honor our joint accomplishments in the cashew sector.


Cashew project to revive Legon Botanical gardens



The Master Training Program ends, but the cashew learning journey has only begun. 25.07.2014

The Master Training Program ends, but the cashew learning journey has only begun.

On Friday, 18th July, 57 participants from 7 West African countries graduated in Sunyani after attending three successive training sessions on cashew value chain promotion in Burkina Faso, Cote d’Ivoire and Ghana to become acknowledged cashew experts.


The third and final session of the Master Training Program took place from 14th to 18th July, 2014 in Sunyani, the Brong-Ahafo region and main cashew growing zone in Ghana. The seven months program offered the 57 participants a wide variety of knowledge on cashew, a platform to share their knowledge, discuss best practices and to build national and regional exchange networks for future collaboration. This time around the event was chaired by the Ministry of Food and Agriculture (MoFA). Resource persons and facilitators included experts from the Cocoa Research institute of Ghana (CRIG), Esoko – a private enterprise that develops communication platforms to help you manage agricultural value chains, Farm Radio international – a Canadian charity that developed rural radio programs to fight poverty and food insecurity, the African Cashew Alliance (ACA) and the African Cashew initiative (ACi). Together, they developed this comprehensive last session, which took participants through topics such as the economics of cashew production and processing, methods for data collection, the development of rural radio programs, improved planting material development, perception management among others. Thanks to the close cooperation with MoFA, participants got the opportunity to visit the cashew research station in Wenchi, where cashew experts from MOFA and CRIG shared their extensive knowledge on improved planting material development. Afterwards the participants met two lead farmers who have successfully applied recommended practices on their fields, resulting in higher yields and more income.


MTP III Photo gallery


The last day of the program was crowned with a Graduation Ceremony and farewell dinner. This highly anticipated event was attended by the Deputy Regional Minister, Brong-Ahafo Region, Country Director of GIZ, the Secretary General of the Ministry of Agriculture, Livestock and Fisheries in Benin, Regional Officer of Agriculture Brong-Ahafo Region, MoFA, Officer of Group Processing, Ministry of Trade and Industry, and the Director Ghana Export Promotions Authority Kumasi, Ashanti and Brong-Ahafo Regions. All guests shared the same opinion in their speeches. The Master Training Program participants went through extensive training with skilled facilitators and resource personnel and have the great potential to continue promoting the cashew value chain when they return to their various host institutions and organizations. They are expected to multiply the existing expertise on cashew as they transfer their gained knowledge to colleagues and co-workers in their home countries.


Please click here


As part of the graduation ceremony, the invited guests handed over certificates to signify participants’ successful participation in the MTP and to acknowledge their learning journeys. Rita Weidinger and GIZ Country Director Siegfried Leffler also acknowledged those participants who have been working in the cashew sector under ACi and/or GIZ. A special citation of appreciation went to Mrs Eleanor Swatson, who was honored with a bronze cashew for her long commitment to the cashew sector in Ghana and beyond.


For more on the graduation ceremony, click here


You can also visit our photo gallery or join us on our Facebook page, www.facebook.com/africancashewinitiative for more updates.


 



Cooperating for Sustainable Development 05.07.2014

Cooperating for Sustainable Development

In line with this year’s International Cooperatives Day, ACi celebrates with cooperatives around the world, while congratulating farmer cooperatives and its partners for their role in helping Cooperative enterprises achieve sustainable development for all


This year’s International Cooperatives Day scheduled to take place on the 5th of July is themed, “Cooperative enterprises achieve sustainable development for all”. The day was instituted by the International cooperative alliance in partnership with the United Nations, to increase awareness of the role of cooperatives and to promote its ideals.


The African Cashew initiative (ACi) since its establishment in 2009, has been working with its partners to promote the competitiveness of African cashew production and to reduce poverty by organising and building a sustainable African cashew sector. ACi interventions focus on sustainable development in its member countries and acknowledge the role of farmer cooperatives in achieving its goals.


Sustainable interventions


ACi monitoring has shown that organized farmers such as farmer cooperatives produce better quality nuts and sell higher quantities than individual farmers and also sell their produce at a price is 10% higher than that of individual farmers. With projects in Ghana, Ivory Coast, Benin, Burkina Faso and Mozambique, ACi works with farmer cooperatives mainly in the areas of training, sector organization and supply chain linkage:


Training: Farmer groups and cooperatives receive training in various topics including Good Agricultural Practices (GAP), harvest and postharvest handling of crops, as well as maintenance, establishment of new farms and cooperative management. Production in these areas has seen a major boost as farmers practice what they have been taught and pass lessons learned on to their colleagues. For example, according to a survey conducted in 2013, farmers’ adoption of fire belts to prevent burning of the orchards is significantly above 90% in all five member countries.


Sector organization:  ACi is involved in the organisation of the cashew sector in its five member countries, stimulating the growth of organisations and farmer cooperatives in the cashew sector while empowering them to effect the formulation of favourable governmental policies in the sector.


Supply chain linkages: In September 2012, ACi launched an innovative project to accelerate the development of the cashew sector and to leverage contributions from farmer cooperatives, buyers and/or retailers, processors as well as public research institutions. The so-called Cashew Matching Fund supports activities in the areas of supply chain linkage, meaning farmer-processor linkages and farmer organization as well as the development of improved planting material.


The results so far have included: 24,275 farmers linked to processors and end markets; 47% of Raw Cashew Nuts (RCN) used by processors are sourced directly from farmers or farmer groups; enhanced research and dissemination of high yielding seedlings to farmers;   increased quality of nuts and farmer yields; 10,772 hectares of land newly planted with cashew (and other intercrops); increased farmer incomes, reduced transaction costs and costs of intermediaries; enhanced knowledge transfer to farmers and; sustainable growth in production and farmer linkage and sustainable cashew supply chain in Ghana, Benin, Burkina Faso and Mozambique. Strong business linkages, higher farm productivity as well as increased and steady farmer income are only few of the remarkable outcomes of Matching Fund activities. Moreover, through interventions of FairMatch Support (FMS), one of ACi’s partners, over 30,000 farmers have their produce reaching high-end specialty markets like Organic and Fairtrade.


These interventions empower smallholders to sustainably improve their livelihoods, food security and to reduce poverty as a whole.


Information and Communication Technologies (ICTs) make cooperatives sustainable.


ACi believes that individual farmers as well as farmer cooperatives, when provided with the necessary resources, can greatly benefit from cashew production and multiply their household incomes. One of these resources is the access to information and communication technologies (ICT) to improve the delivery and effectiveness of high amounts of data and information to and from smallholder farmers, making their transactions less cumbersome and ensuring reliability of the supply chain at the same time.


The partnership between the African Cashew initiative and the German software company, SAP, commenced in 2011 with a goal to provide smallholder farmers with ICT applications that enable them to do collaborative business in a transparent and sustainable way.


The pilot project which was first introduced to the Wenchi Farmer Cooperative in the Brong Ahafo Region of Ghana, electronically tracks all relevant business transactions in the field such as pre-finance, farmer registration, crop receipt, logistics and payments. The primary value proposition is the creation of a reliable supply chain, based on long-term trading relations, where bottlenecks can easily be identified and addressed.


This system has helped farmers to improve their organizational efficiency, to ensure transparency of business operations and to run detailed data analysis. Ultimately, it helps farmers to access profitable markets more easily. Buyers on the other hand are able to plan and forecast their trading more accurately, enabling reliable and trusted business relationships with farmers. It has also made it possible for buyers to source from smallholder producers who have previously been largely excluded from formal trading systems. By building a trustful business relationship with the buyer, the farmer becomes more integrated into the buyer’s supply chain and is more likely to repeatedly sell to this buyer: the farmer is now registered, learns techniques to improve quality and has better access to finance. When a farmer can prove that he has an ongoing buying contract, he can use it as collateral to receive a loan from a local bank. On the other hand, the buyer can purchase predictable amounts of produce at a stable quality each year. In the long run, the system maintains good business relationship between farmers, farmer cooperatives and buyers.


In addition, ACi has also provided farmers with interactive farmer trainings on topics such as proper harvest and post-harvest techniques through short message service (sms) and radio messages. These tailor-made training messages developed through the collaborative work of extension workers, farmers and other actors reach over 20,000 cashew farmers during the cropping season.


Already in its second phase, the African Cashew initiative is on the path to achieving sustainable development. By working with farmer cooperatives and implementing interventions to increase farmers’ competitiveness, African cashew farmers are being empowered to reduce poverty and increase development sustainably.


 



SIETTA 2014 Launch – The International Cashew Processing Event in 2014 13.06.2014

SIETTA 2014 Launch – The International Cashew Processing Event in 2014

On Tuesday, June 10th, The International Cashew Processing Equipment & Technology Show (SIETTA 2014) was officially launched at Hotel Tiama in Abidjan, Côte d’Ivoire.


The Ivorian Cotton and Cashew Council (CCA) under the Ministry of Mining and Industry, and the Ministry of Agriculture, officially launched SIETTA 2014 to be held from 26th to 28th November at Palais des Sports Treichville in Abidjan, Côte d’Ivoire.


For three days, SIETTA 2014 offers food and agro processing equipment manufacturers an opportunity to Show & Sell their machines and to access the huge potential of the African cashew sector, with a special focus on Côte d’Ivoire. SIETTA 2014 is the international exhibition to promote cashew processing equipment and technology and is expected to attract 500 international processors, investors, and professionals across the cashew sector as well as 5000 local visitors including banks, entrepreneurs, and processors. This unique event offers a platform to exchange with actors across the cashew value chain, to create and extend business networks when meeting prospective investors and customers from all over the world.  At SIETTA 2014 you can do business with the right people in the right place and now is the right time for Africa’s cashew sector. 


As the world’s second largest cashew producer and the fastest growing producer of raw cashew nuts worldwide, Côte d'Ivoire is welcoming prospective investors and visitors to the beautiful city of Abidjan, which is among the safest and most hospitable cities in Africa. With its safe and stable business environment, Côte d’Ivoire is one of the fastest emerging countries in Africa.


The Ivorian Cotton and Cashew Council (CCA) works in close cooperation with the African Cashew initiative (ACi) in organizing this exhibition. In order to attract a large international audience to Show & Sell their equipment, SIETTA 2014 offers a wide range of special premium packages for exhibiters with large, medium and small scale equipment, and also for national and international companies to display their information materials on multimedia stands. Tell us what you need and we make it work!


For more information in SIETTA 2014, please contact info@SIETTA2014.com or visit the SIETTA 2014 website under www.SIETTA2014.com



Devenir un formateur des formateurs ; Le profile d’un formateur. 11.06.2014

Devenir un formateur des formateurs ; Le profile d’un formateur.

Du 14 au 19 juillet 2014, la dernière session du Programme de Formation pour la Maîtrise de la Promotion de Chaînes de Valeur du Cajou Africain se déroulera à Sunyani, Ghana. Adèle OUEDRAOGO, une des participantes partage avec nous son expérience.


Apres le succès des premières et deuxièmes sessions du MTP, la troisième aura lieu à Sunyani, dans la région de Brong-Ahafo qui est la principale zone de production du cajou au Ghana.


A la fin de cette session, les participants seront certifiés formateurs et auront un effet multiplicateur sur la filière de cajou en partageant les connaissances.


Adèle fait partie  de ces participants. Voilà, ses expériences quant au  Programme de Formation pour la Maîtrise de la Promotion de Chaînes de Valeur du Cajou Africain.


 


Profil D’Adèle R.OUEDRAOGO; Une Formatrice De Formateurs


Quelle est votre parcours professionnel?
J’ai suivi une formation d’ingénieur du développement rural, option agronomie stage laboratoire phytopathologie. J’ai aussi un diplôme approfondi en science du sol, collaboration INERA et uni Bobo, stage sur la fertilisation du coton enquêtes : rendement iCA, sur riz avec INERA


Quand avez-vous rejoins iCA?
Aout 2013


Quelles ont été vos tâches et responsabilités au sein d’iCA?  Que retenez-vous du temps passé à iCA?
Agent de terrain : assurer l’ intérim du  point focal à Bobo-Dioulasso, préparation des formations sur les bonnes pratiques de récolte et post récolte et d’entretien de vergers d’anacarde, élaboration et suivi des contrats de subvention locale, préparation et suivi des formations, préparation de première session MTP, capitalisation d’iCA.


Vous avez rejoint le MASA récemment. Comment s’est passé votre intégration  au MASA ?
Le MASA a lancé un concours de recrutement de 7 Ingénieurs du développement rural, en décembre 2013, et après avoir pris part à ce concours, j’ai été admise.


Quelles sont vos tâches et responsabilités au MASA?
Plusieurs Services, mais ce n’est pas encore clair, je souhaite être affectée  à une des DRASA de la zone de production de cajou


Qu’es ce que vous avez le plus aimez en travaillant dans le secteur du Cajou?
J’aime bien les formations des producteurs. Au début, les producteurs de cajou n’avaient pas assez connaissance sur la production de cajou. Mais, les formations ont eu un impact grand sur la production et sur les habitudes des producteurs.


Qu’es ce que vous avez trouvez être comme défis à relever en travaillant dans le secteur du Cajou ?
Commercialisation: le système n'est pas bien organisé. Des réunions entre les producteurs et les transformateurs sont indispensables .Il faut de ces réunions pour déterminer des prix favorables pour tous les acteurs. Aussi, il n’y a pas encore système pour améliorer le prix du cajou de haute qualité, cela n’encourage pas les producteurs  à appliquer le  BPA.


Vous faite partie du programme iCA/ACA des maitres formateurs, Quelle appréciation faite vous du programme? Qu’es ce que vous trouvez le plus enrichissant et le plus captivant concernant le programme ? Qu’es qui était nouveau pour vous ou un défi ?
L’appréciation que je fais de ce programme, est qu’il permet la mise en place d’un pool d’expert dans les pays membres, qui va pérenniser les acquis et les activités du projet. Ce qui m’a le plus captivé, c’est la définition du concept « chaine de valeur ajoutée ».


Comment envisagez- vous intégrer votre expérience/Connaissance/Réseau que vous avez obtenu en travaillant avec iCA et en faisant partie du MTP dans votre nouveau travail au sein du MASA ?
J’envisage faire des propositions concrètes au MASA, pour une organisation de la filière cajou au Burkina Faso. Aussi, je souhaite œuvrer à pérenniser les acquis du projet ICA.



Olam Ghana sets the pace in sustainable Corporate Social Responsibility 04.06.2014

Olam Ghana sets the pace in sustainable Corporate Social Responsibility

OLAM Ghana’s social and economic impact has been awarded with the Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) award. The company believes that this is mostly as a result of its investment in the cashew sector in partnership with the African Cashew intiative.


Olam International based in Singapore is a global leader in supply chain management and processing of agricultural products. For many years, Olam has sourced its high quality produce from about 65 countries and supplies them to over 11,600 customers all over the world. Olam Ghana was established in 1994 and began by exporting shea nuts and later, cashew, cocoa and cotton. Its commitment to sustainability and responsible growth accounts for its achievements.


Since 2013, Olam Ghana is ACi Matching Fund partner and engages in various activities to increase farmer income and raw cashew nut quality by distributing improved planting materials, organising farmer trainings and promoting farmer associations. Olam’s sustainability and social responsibility initiatives, which includes the Matching Fund projects, accounts for its accomplishment as Ghana’s leading exporter of raw cashew nuts and for receiving the Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) award. The African Cashew initiative is proud to have Olam Ghana as a partner and congratulates its recent achievements.


Olam Ghana wins CSR award.



Vietnam soutien la filière anacarde Ivoirienne 23.05.2014

Vietnam soutien la filière anacarde Ivoirienne

La Côte d’Ivoire a participé du 15 au 17 mai dernier, à la Conférence internationale sur la filière anacarde à Bà Rịa dans la province de Vũng Tàu au Vietnam. La conférence est marquée par la signature d’un protocole d’accord de coopération.


A l’invitation de l’association Vietnamienne du cajou (VINACAS), le Conseil du Coton et de l’Anacarde (CCA) a participé à une conférence internationale sur la filière anacarde. Au cours de laquelle, la CCA a échangé avec le VINACAS de leurs expériences respectives, des enjeux et la possibilité de collaboration, afin d’améliorer la filière.  Le Directeur General de CCA, M. Malamine SANOGO a souligné les efforts fournit des opérateurs Ivoirien et de l’Etat tout en rassurant les industriels vietnamiens du soutien de la Cote d’Ivoire quant à une politique d’industrialisation progressive de la filière. Le CCA et VINACAS a signé un protocole d’accord de coopération pour consolider leur association. La conférence s’est terminée par une  exposition d’équipements de transformation et une occasion pour prendre des contacts en vue de l’organisation du Salon International des Equipements et Technologies de Transformation de l’Anacarde à Abidjan.


Voilà la redynamisation de la filière anacarde


En lire plus



Cashew – an opportunity for poverty reduction in ACP countries 22.05.2014

Cashew – an opportunity for poverty reduction in ACP countries

ACP Secretariat committed to develop the cashew commodity sector


The demand for cashew nuts – the popular and nutritious snack and food source – is rising globally. With Africa turning out 1.2 million tons per year, the Africa Cashew Initiative (ACi) has highlighted the notable opportunities of cashew production and growing markets for the African, Caribbean, and Pacific Group of States (ACP).


In a presentation to ACP Secretary General H.E Alhaji Muhammad Mumuni and trade and commodity experts at the ACP Secretariat in Brussels last week, ACi Executive Director Rita Weidinger gave an overview of the untapped prospects in the ACP that could further boost economies and contribute to poverty reduction. After sharing these encouraging results of ACi's 5-years work, the ACP Secretary General stressed his commitment to further develop the cashew sector in ACP countries. The multistakeholder and multifunctional approach, as demonstrated by the African Cashew Initiative, shall be further upscaled within Africa and also extended to Carribean and Pacific countries. Given a secured market access and building in-country transformation, a structured value chain of the product will allow poverty alleviation for more than 1.5 million poor farmers.

 

For more information, please click here

 


Good harvest and strong prices for farmers in Benin 20.05.2014

Good harvest and strong prices for farmers in Benin

The cashew season in Benin is ending and farmers saw a productive year and more profits


Since 2012 and as part of the ACi Matching Fund, Self help Africa in cooperation with cashew processor Tolaro Global has been training cashew farmers in Central Benin. Through the Pepsica project, they established a ‘model farm’ on which cashew farmers apply Good Agricultural Practices (GAP). After witnessing the benefits of such recommended practices, farmers were motivated to replicate these on their own farms. Today most cashew farmers in Central Benin are enjoying higher yields, stable prices and better incomes. Self help Africa hopes to extend this project to other regions.


For more information on the Pepsica project, click here



L’assurance de l’etat aux producteurs d’anacarde 15.05.2014

L’assurance de l’etat aux producteurs d’anacarde

La filière ivoirienne de l’anacarde se porte bien et le gouvernement fait tous pour le maintenir.


Selon le directeur du Conseil du Coton et de l’Anacarde, M. Sanogo Malamine, << Le gouvernement est très attentif de l’évolution de la filière et donc nous ne laisserons personne perturber la reforme. >> En effet, le prix reste toujours à 225FCFA même si les exportateurs ne sont pas  favorable. Cette directive fait partie des mesures gouvernementales pour améliorer la filière.


Voilà le bilan à mi-parcours de la campagne 2014


Pour en savoir plus sur les efforts de gouvernement pour améliorer la filière, cliquez ici


 



Résolution du Programme de Formation pour la maitrise de la promotion des chaines de valeurs du cajou 13.05.2014

Résolution du Programme de Formation pour la maitrise de la promotion des chaines de valeurs du cajou

La seconde session du Programme de Formation pour la maitrise de la promotion des Chaines de valeurs du Cajou s`est déroulée avec succès et a pris fin le vendredi 11 avril 2014.


La clôture a été marquée par un diner sous le parrainage du Préfet de la Région de Gbeke, en compagnie du Sous-Préfet de Bouake, représentant du Maire de Bouake, du Directeur Régional de l`Agriculture de Gbeke, du Directeur General du Conseil du Coton et de l`Anacarde, la Directrice Exécutive de iCA et du représentant de ACA.

L`agenda des cinq jours comportait les méthodes de formation d`adultes, les opérations de récolte et de post récolte, les bonnes pratiques agricoles, les maladies et leur traitement, l`accès au financement, les systèmes d`information sur le marché, la transformation du cajou, la visite de l`usine de traitement du cajou de OLAM (la plus grande en Afrique) et le développement d`un plan de travail en termes de préparation des activités de la seconde intersession.

La prochaine session se déroulera du 14 au 19 Juillet 2014, a Sunyani, dans la région de BrongAhafo qui constitue la principale zone de production du Cajou au Ghana.


En lire plus ici



Faire connaissance avec les partenaires. Partager les connaissances. Lier le savoir théorique à des expériences pratiques. 16.04.2014

Faire connaissance avec les partenaires. Partager les connaissances. Lier le savoir théorique à des expériences pratiques.

Après le succès de la première session, la seconde session du Programme de Formation pour la maitrise de la promotion des Chaines de valeurs du Cajou s`est également déroulée avec succès du lundi 7 avril 2014 au vendredi 11 avril 2014.


La clôture de la seconde session a été marquée par un diner sous le parrainage du Préfet de la Région de Gbêke, en compagnie du Sous-Préfet de Bouaké, le représentant du Maire de Bouaké, du Directeur Régional de l`Agriculture de Gbêke, du Directeur General du Conseil du Coton et de l`Anacarde, la Directrice Exécutive d’iCA et du représentant de ACA.


Le programme de Formation pour la maitrise de la promotion des Chaines de valeurs du Cajou est une plateforme d`apprentissage au sein des pays de l`Afrique de l`Ouest où les experts des chaines de valeur du Cajou discutent des meilleures pratiques, partagent les leçons apprises, développent des partenariats et échangent les connaissances.  L`agenda des cinq jours comportait les méthodes de formation d`adultes, les opérations de récolte et de post récolte, les bonnes pratiques agricoles, les maladies et leur traitement, l`accès au financement, les systèmes d`information sur le marché, la transformation du cajou, la visite de l`usine de traitement du cajou de OLAM (la plus grande en Afrique) et le développement d`un plan de travail en terme  de préparation des activités de la seconde intersession. Les Facilitateurs et les experts formateurs ont fait des présentations, évalué  et adapté  chaque session  en relation avec les besoins des participants.


Entre la première session de Bobo tenue en Décembre 2013 et la présente session de Bouake, les participants ont réalisé des activités individuelles et en groupes de recherche sur des thèmes spécifiques concernant les chaines de valeur. Les Formateurs ont particulièrement exploité les rapports des revues par les paires durant le premier et le dernier jour de la formation. Cette approche a permis aux coaches et aux participants de partager et d`apprécier leur savoir-faire.


Pour la seconde intersession et la visite de terrain, huit groupes ont constitués avec les participants des différents pays ayant au préalable établi leurs plans de travail qui seront exécutés selon les différents thèmes des chaines de valeurs. Comme composante de l`intersession, l`élaboration des plans de travail constitue une des activités des participants. Dans ce cadre, les participants utiliseront des présentations simultanées, joueront des rôles interactifs et mèneront des discussions pour élaborer leurs plans de travail.


Pendant une séance d`échanges dans l`après-midi du vendredi, les participants ont fait part de leur appréciation sur les sessions interactives et les opportunités d`application des théories et des méthodes et  reçu des réactions directes de leurs collègues ainsi que de leurs coaches (session sur le KOR et la séparation de la noix de la pomme).


A la fin de la seconde session, les participants auront franchi une étape de plus pour être certifiés Formateurs sur la maitrise de la promotion des chaines de valeurs disposant d`une connaissance approfondie. Ayant la qualité de formateur des formateurs, les participants engendrent  un effet multiplicateur sur l`industrie du cajou en partageant les connaissances acquises au sein de leurs organisations et bien au-delà.


La prochaine session se déroulera du 14 au 19 Juillet 2014, à Sunyani, dans la région de Brong Ahafo qui constitue la principale zone de production du Cajou au Ghana.


 



A common future for EU-Africa: Engaging the private sector in sustainable and inclusive growth 11.04.2014

A common future for EU-Africa: Engaging the private sector in sustainable and inclusive growth

Mr. Guillaume Razack Ishola Kinninnon, Executive Director of SWCM, a leading company in the cashew and agricultral trade sector in West Africa, has overcome many challenges as growing African owned business.


SWCM’s efforts in ensuring quality and excellence and in creating a competitive edge has worn it many awards and accolades, including the 2012 BID Arch of Europe Award making it a role-model for other African enterprises. Mr. Kinninnon recently took part in the 5th EU-Africa Business Forum in Brussels organized by the International Trade Centre (ITC). The 5th EU-Africa Business Forum looked at the way forward in boosting the economic growth and regional economic exchange whilst considering the involvement of the private sector. There, Mr. Kinninon joined other African entrepreneurs at a Roundtable discussion on African SME Success Stories, sharing some of his insights. One major lesson, as Mr. Kinninnon stated, is to establish good relationships with producers. He demonstrates this in Benin in long buying arrangements with the cashew farmers unions. Another step in the business growth is to get together with other businesses and exporters, to jointly advocate for enabling business environment. Mr. Kinninnon is one of the founders of the Cashew Exporters Association in Benin (CONEC).


For other ways by which thriving economies can bolster growth and regional economic intergration, please click here


Building resilient African economies through trade


Harvest, what you have planted: Launch of Ghana’s cashew season 2014 01.04.2014

Harvest, what you have planted: Launch of Ghana’s cashew season 2014

On Thursday, March 27th, 2014 producers, processors, exporters, researchers, policy makers and other cashew stakeholders celebrate the beginning of a new cashew season in Wenchi, the Brong Ahafo Region in Ghana.


“Harnessing the economic and climatic benefits of cashew; the strategic non-traditional export commodity” is the theme of this first cashew season launch, said Ms Yayra Afua Amedzro, Executive Secretary of the Ghana Cashew Industry Association. The inauguration of the cashew season shall become an annual event, bringing together all cashew industry players, to discuss and set a national agenda for the upcoming seasons.


In his keynote speech, the Deputy Minister of Trade, Hon. Nii Lante Vanderpuye, confirmed the president’s commitment to the cashew sector. He further stated that both the Ministry of Trade and Industry (MOTI) and the Ministry of Food and Agriculture (MOFA) are devoted to support the cashew sector. He highlighted the potential of cashew becoming the richest export earning industry, especially with Ghana’s advantage of having a comparatively large cashew processing industry. Currently, the country receives USD 170 Million in foreign exchange earnings from cashew, making it the second highest non-traditional export crop in Ghana. The African Cashew initiative is supporting the Ministry of Food and Agriculture in drafting a Cashew Master Plan for the Ghanaian cashew sector. The government was called upon to legally support this plan for the future development of the cashew sector in Ghana.


Currently, Ghanaian cashew farmers produce 50,000 MT of raw cashew nuts annually. With inflows from Côte d’Ivoire, Burkina Faso and Benin more than 150,000 MT of raw cashew nuts are exported to major destinations such as India, Vietnam and Brazil. Ghana holds the largest cashew processing industry in West Africa, with a local capacity of up to 30,000 MT, creating employment for thousands of people living in rural areas, most of them being women. Currently, ACi in cooperation with the Ministry of Food and Agriculture (MOFA) and the Cocoa Research institute in Ghana (CRIG) invest extensively in cashew research and the development of improved planting material. It is estimated that Ghana’s cashew production can be tripled over the next ten years, if all players pull on the same strings.


After the event, KONA (a cashew nut processor), Pinora (a cashew apple processor), Peace Corps and Cocoa Research Institute (CRIG) displayed various cashew products. Some nursery operators had the opportunity to showcase and advertise  improved grafted seedlings. Also ACi showed a training video on “How to establish new cashew farms” to educate farmers after the program. To watch the video, please click here


The event was organized by the Ghana Cashew Industry Association and supported by the African Cashew initiative (ACi), the African Cashew Alliance (ACA), West African Markets Link (WAML) and the Export Development and Agricultural Investment Fund (EDAIF).


 


 



Une femme entrepreneur ouvre la voie à d’autres femmes. 31.03.2014

Une femme entrepreneur ouvre la voie à d’autres femmes.

Suite à son succès en tant que promotrice de la société de transformation industrielle de l’anacarde au Burkina Faso (SOTRIA-B SARL), Aminata Koné a été élevée au grade de chevalier d’honneur du Burkina Faso.


La transformation de l’anacarde au Burkina Faso est une occasion d’augmenter les revenus du pays et ceux des familles. Depuis son ouverture en 2006, la SOTRIA-B emploie au moins 200 personnes dont 90% de femmes. Par ailleurs, elle se porte bien et ses produits sont commercialisés à travers le monde. Aujourd’hui, elle est parmi les plus grands transformateurs de noix de cajou au Burkina Faso et suscite l’espoir en montrant qu’avec détermination et le travail bien fait on peut réussir.


Aminata Koné, en voilà une qui a osé


 



Amélioration de la qualité et de la productivité de la noix de cajou Le Conseil du Coton et de l’Anacarde s’unit avec le Firca et l’Anader 26.03.2014

Amélioration de la qualité et de la productivité de la noix de cajou Le Conseil du Coton et de l’Anacarde s’unit avec le Firca et l’Anader

Le Conseil du Coton et de l`Anacarde s`engage dans la dynamique de renforcer et de relever davantage la position de la Côte d’Ivoire avec ses 500.000 tonnes de production annuelle de noix de cajou, au rang de premier producteur africain de noix de cajou.


Les producteurs d’anacarde peuvent se réjouir. Dans sa volonté d’accroître durablement la production, la productivité  et d’améliorer la qualité des noix de cajou ainsi que les revenus des producteurs, le Conseil du Coton et de l’Anacarde (CCA) vient de se trouver de bons alliés. Il a signé, à son siège, aux II Plateaux, vendredi dernier, une convention avec le Fonds Interprofessionnel pour la Recherche et le Conseil Agricoles (Firca) et l’Agence Nationale d’Appui au Développement Rural (Anader).


Malamine SANOGO, Directeur Général du Conseil du Coton et de l’Anacarde, a inscrit cette initiative dans le cadre de la réalisation de l’objectif principal de la réforme, à savoir le bien-être des producteurs qui passe nécessairement par l’amélioration de la valeur marchande des noix. « Ceci n’est possible que par la mise à la disposition des milliers de petits producteurs des techniques simples et efficaces aussi bien pour la conduite de leur verger, que pour la récolte et la conservation des noix afin d’en améliorer la qualité et le rendement à l’hectare ». D’où l’intérêt de cette convention tripartite relative à l’encadrement des paysans  qui lie le CCA au FIRCA et à l’ANADER.


Pour le Directeur Général de l’ANADER, Dr SIDIKI Cissé, «l’encadrement des producteurs reste un défi pour son agence qui compte bien le relever».


Le Directeur Exécutif du FIRCA, Pierre Ackah ANGNIMAN, n’a pas non plus caché sa joie de participer à cette œuvre. « Ma structure jouera sa partition », a-t-il promis.


Les objectifs spécifiques vises par la convention tripartite se résument ainsi qu`il suit :


-         assurer l’information, la sensibilisation et la formation des producteurs aux bonnes pratiques agricoles ;


-         collecter des informations sur la production ;


-         assurer un appui à la commercialisation primaire ;


-         rendre compte des résultats d’exécution de l’encadrement dédié par la production de rapports périodiques.  



Spreading Nut-How: Modern ICTs transform agricultural extension and advisory services 25.03.2014

Spreading Nut-How: Modern ICTs transform agricultural extension and advisory services

Better access to modern information and communication technologies (ICT) improve the delivery and effectiveness of information to millions of smallholder farmers.


ACi, in partnership with the German software company SAP, provide cashew farmer cooperatives with ICT applications to do collaborative business in a more transparent and sustainable way. The SAP software system assigns barcoded bags to each farmer in the cooperative to track collective cashew sales. Every bag of nuts traded is scanned by the buying agents with their smartphones. To calculate the recent market price, each bag weighted and the data are typed into the smartphone application. Once the sale is made, the farmer immediately receives a digital receipt of the transaction and the cooperative has an electronic record in its books.


The Virtual Cooperative system has helped farmers improve their organizational efficiency, ensure transparency of business operations and run detailed data analysis. Ultimately the system helps farmers to access profitable markets more easily. Meanwhile buyers, including local processors, have been able to plan and forecast their trading more accurately which enables in the long term reliable and trusted business relationships to farmers. The system has also enabled them to buy from smallholder producers who have previously been largely excluded from formal trading systems.


How ACi and SAP plan to ensure sales and supply through integrating farmers into supply chain management software is explained in more detail in the newest GIZ publication on Connect to BoP - A guide to Leveraging ICT for inclusive Business, page 54.


With regards to e-agricultural extension, ACi provided interactive farmer trainings on farm maintenance as well as proper harvest and post-harvest technologies which were complemented by radio messages and short message service (SMS) during the cropping season. About 20,000 cashew farmers received key messages, developed collaboratively by farmers, extension agents and other actors, adapted to farmers’ needs and delivered as appropriate, during the year. 


More and more conservative agricultural extension approaches are complemented by modern information and communication technologies. What ICT can do, where it reaches its limits and what still needs to be done to deliver accurate, timely and target information to smallholder farmers is discussed in an article published in Rural 21 Magazine on Modern ICTs and rural extension: Have we reached the tipping point?



12 Facts on the Cashew Sector Reforms in Côte d’Ivoire 13.03.2014

12 Facts on the Cashew Sector Reforms in Côte d’Ivoire

After the socio-economic crisis in September 2002, the Ivorian government took up the responsibility to structure and optimize the cashew value chain.


1 Already in 1991, the government of Côte d’Ivoire passed a law to regulate commercial trade of agricultural products and declared the export of agricultural commodities via land borders as illegal unless an exemption was granted. The law foresees that all agricultural goods are exported through the ports of Abidjan and San Pedro, against collection of taxes.


2 As part of the cashew sector reform process in September 2013, ARECA, the former regulation authority for cashew and cotton was transformed to the Conseil du Coton et de l’Anacarde (CCA) to regulate, monitor and develop activities in the cotton and cashew sector. The CCA Board is made of 6 representatives of the state and another 6 representatives from the private sector. For the implementation of the reforms, the Conseil du Café-Cacao made an advance contribution of more than 1.8 billion FCFA to CCA.


3 Projections show that Côte d’Ivoire is becoming the largest cashew producing country worldwide by 2018. The current average cashew productivity rests at 2.4 kg/tree with an average KOR (kernel outturn ratio) of 46 and 450,000 MT of raw cashew nuts produced in 2013. Ivorian cashew production is expected to grow by 15 % annually, based on current projection figures.


4 The opening of the cashew season officially started at 15th February, 2014. The bottom farm gate price for well dried and sorted high quality cashew nuts was at 225 FCFA/kg for the most part of the 2014 cashew season. The fixed price may be revised according to the CIF price development, by the end of this season.


5 The current in-country processing of raw cashew nuts (RCN) accounts for 6 % of the local production. In order to increase value addition, the Ivorian government targets 35% in-county RCN processing by 2015 and 100% in-county RCN processing by 2020.


6 Currently,13 processing factories are operational with a total installed capacity of 50,100 MT per annum. Among them are 7 small-scale (> 1,000 MT), 4 medium-scale (1,000 to 5,000 MT) and 2 large-scale (< 5,000 MT) processing units. There are an additional 6 satellite processing units that adding up to the total installed capacity of Olam international, the biggest RCN processor in Cote d’Ivoire. Another 3 factories are under construction with an additional planned capacity of 5,000 MT.


7 After conducting an economic study, the government in Côte d’Ivoire raises minimum wages by 50%.


8 As part of a new marketing strategy for cashew export promotion, the establishment of 48 licensed warehouses is planed until end of 2014.


9 In order to structure the national marketing system, major operators such as cooperatives, buyers and exporters are identified and licensed. So far, CCA has licensed 471 buyers, 68 business entities and 225 cooperatives and cooperative associations. Unregistered exporters are officially banned from purchasing directly from producers or processors. The council is also responsible for all operational arrangements including appropriate sanctions to ensure that the minimum price is paid to producers.


10 To ensure transparency and reliability of the marketing system, CCA initiated collaboration with SAP, a German software developer, to improve the documentation and traceability of commercial transactions from farmers to processor and to exporters.


11 For better learning, exchange and effective collaboration between the various actors in the cashew sector, CCA is establishing a representative and credible inter-professional organization made of producers, producer cooperatives, processors, exporters and buyers.


12 In November 2014, the first cashew processing equipment exhibition will take place in Abidjan. The event is organized by CCA in cooperation with ACi, the African Cashew Alliance (ACA) and Boloré Africa Logistics.


 



Field Trip to Olam Ivoire SA 07.03.2014

Field Trip to Olam Ivoire SA

On Friday, February 14, 2014, ACi and its Core Partners visited two satellite cashew processing units of Olam Ivoire SA.


In 2004, Olam installed a manual processing unit in Dimbokro with a capacity of 12.000 MT of RCN processed per annum. This unit employs about 1200 workers, with 80% of them being women. Here, cashews are processed manually going through different stages, from steaming and shelling to packaging the white kernels for export. All cashew processed in Dimbokro receive organic certification. In Djekanou, Olam recently installed a fully mechanized peeling unit with an average capacity of 10 MT kernels peeled per day. This unit runs three shifts per day. Peeled kernels from Djekanou are also packaged in Dimbokro.


ACi together with representatives of the Conseil du Coton et de l'Anacarde (CCA), IDH, SAP, INCAJU, the Ministry of Food and Agriculture of Ghana visited these processing sites. At their arrival to Djekanou, they were introduced to Olam’s social welfare policies. They discussed means by which Olam supports their employees and the various communities in which they operate. Factory managers Mr. Simranjeet Singh, Mr. Camara and others also informed their visitors about Olam’s code of conduct: “Food safety and traceability is a key component in all processes”.


After a lunch offered by OLAM, the delegation continued to Dimbokro and Djekanou to visit the two satellite processing units:


The delegation ended their visit in the late afternoon. Before returning to Abidjan, the participants thanked Olam for the informative and insightful tour. “By opening their doors, sharing lessons learnt and best practices, Olam again proved to be a pioneer in the cashew processing sector in Africa”, stated Mary Adzanyo, Director Private Sector Development (ACi).



MoFA – a modern African Ministry introduces ICT solutions for Agricultural Development 04.03.2014

MoFA – a modern African Ministry introduces ICT solutions for Agricultural Development

The Ghanaian Ministry of Food and Agriculture introduces e-Agriculture, an online-based platform, to connect farmers to agricultural information networks.


The livelihoods of farmers rise and fall with the accurate information on farming technologies. Ever since farmers started to grow crops, they have been asking about the most effective ways of cultivation, where to get their farm inputs and which harvest and post-harvest measures they shall apply. By introducing ICT-based agricultural extension system, MoFA takes on the responsibility of connecting smallholder farmers to knowledge, networks and institutions necessary to improve productivity, food security and employment opportunities.


The e-Agriculture system is financed by the World Banks West Africa Agricultural Productivity Program (WAAPP). A multilingual interactive voice response system and regional call centers offer up-to-date and validated information on farming technologies in 11 local languages.  Farmers, governments and experts provided best fitted farming solutions, based on a diverse set of expertise and experiences to develop these information databases.


With the introduction of the e-Agriculture system, MOFA commits to mobilize resources to make agricultural extension information available to farmers, everywhere, and at all times.


To find out more about e-Agriculture in MoFA, please click here



Review of the Global Cashew Market in 2013 & Forecast for the Year 2014 19.02.2014

Review of the Global Cashew Market in 2013 & Forecast for the Year 2014

The African Cashew initiative (ACi), since its establishment in 2009, has closely observed global cashew market trends and implemented activities according to market needs.


How the cashew market functions is determined by a number of factors including, but not limited to demand and supply trends, as well as available stocks. This study is concerned with the statistics of the cashew market in 2013, the outlook for 2014 and the years ahead. This summary provides a brief overview and analysis of current cashew market trends and highlights the role of the African Cashew Alliance (ACA) and the African Cashew initiative (ACi) in the development of the African cashew sector.


Read the full report here



Benin meets Ghana – ACi Master Training Program triggers regional exchange and joint learning 17.02.2014

Benin meets Ghana – ACi Master Training Program triggers regional exchange and joint learning

From 16th to 17th January, 2014 representatives from two farmer organizations in Benin traveled to the Brong-Ahafo Region in Ghana to learn about Good Agricultural Practices, farmer linkage programs and cashew marketing strategies.


The visit was planned during the first session of the ACi/ACA Master Training Program held in Bobo-Dioulasso, Burkina Faso in December 2013. The program aims at developing a pool of certified West African cashew experts with in-depth knowledge on the cashew value chain. After attending the first session, participants became curious about best practices, success stories and lessons learnt in other West African countries. Getting a deeper understanding of how cashew is grown, processed and traded in a neighboring country is what triggered this educational trip.

As part of a two day program, the team from Benin met two ACi supported cashew processing factories (Mim and Kona), a cashew apple processor and the Wenchi Farmer Union. The four Beninese visitors arrived with many questions and great ambitions for learning from their Ghanaian neighbors.

During their meeting with Mim and Kona, the Benin team raised question about the sourcing of Raw Cashew Nuts (RCN) and learned about the various processing steps. They were especially interested in farmer linkage programs, as well as marketing strategies of processed kernels. The Mim factory manager informed them about a quality based payment system. This system is an integrated part of the linkage program and helps to ensure that farmers supply high quality raw nuts. The general agreement is: The better the quality, the higher the price.

In discussion with the Wenchi Farmer Union, the Benin team was particularly attentive to the application of Good Agricultural Practices and issues to improve the quality of Raw Cashew Nuts. Beninese farmers inquired from their Ghanaian colleagues on how to market their raw nuts, and their specific experiences having buying contracts with processors, buyers and other actors in the value chain. One farmer prefers the security of ready market and predictable price, whilst others still tend to be attracted to potential short term gains and want to find the best paying buyer at each moment in the season. This discrepancy tends to hamper an effective bulk-selling, which is however gradually improving.

The Wenchi Farmer Union was impressed by their neighbors for organizing this educational trip and is inspired to meet them again in Benin for a continuous exchange and learning beyond national borders and language boundaries.



Le Conseil du coton et de l’anacarde présente les opportunités 17.02.2014

Le Conseil du coton et de l’anacarde présente les opportunités

La filière coton-anacarde n’est pas restée en marge Forum investir en Côte d’Ivoire (ICI 2014), tenu du 29 janvier au 01 février dernier, à Abidjan.


Sponsor gold, le Conseil du coton et de l’anacarde a saisi cette occasion pour présenter les opportunités d’affaires qu’offre ce secteur d’activité. A cet effet, Malamine SANOGO, Directeur Général (DG) du Conseil du Coton et de l’anacarde, a fait partie d’un panel sur le thème : « comment accélérer la transformation de l’anacarde ? ». M. Sanogo a indiqué à l’endroit des investisseurs que la Côte d’Ivoire a amorcé une réforme des filières coton-anacarde en mettant l’accent notamment sur l’accroissement de la transformation locale à moyen terme afin d’améliorer le prix bord champ. « Nous attendons que vous nous aidiez à transformer notre production en 2013 estimée à 500.000 tonnes dont seulement 30.000 T ont été transformées », a-t-il fait savoir.


Par ailleurs, plus de 300 personnes dont des hommes d’affaires, des journalistes de la presse nationale et internationale, des cadres de l’administration, ont visité le stand du Conseil du coton et de l’anacarde. A ces visiteurs, les animateurs leur ont expliqué les points saillants de la réforme de ces deux filières. Ils leur ont également annoncé un projet majeur du Conseil de régulation, de suivi et de développement du binôme coton-anacarde. A savoir le Salon International des Equipements et des Technologies de Transformation de l’Anacarde (SIETTA 2014), une plate-forme de vulgarisation des outils de transformation de la noix de cajou. ICI 2014 a réuni en quatre jours 3733 participants venus de 103 pays dont 270 exposants étrangers. Au niveau national, ce sont 2242 participants et 149 exposants. Près de 3000 investisseurs, les institutions financières internationales, la Banque mondiale, le Fonds monétaire international (Fmi), la Banque africaine de développement (Bad), l’Agence française de développement (Afd), l’Uemoa, etc. ont pris part à ce rendez-vous. Selon le Premier ministre Daniel Kablan Duncan, ce sont 443 milliards FCFA d’intention d’investissements qui ont été enregistrés au terme de ce conclave.



The Cashew Way Forward: ACi Annual Planning Meeting 2014 06.02.2014

The Cashew Way Forward: ACi Annual Planning Meeting 2014

End of January, the ACi Team held its annual planning meeting in Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso in an effort to revise vision and strategy in line with the overall market developments.


The joint vision remains clear: We want to take the African cashew sector to a next level of competitiveness in the upcoming year. More challenging is the question on the knowledge transfer and exit strategy of ACi. Yield levels are gradually improving, however its only Ghana where we can observe an average of 900kg/ ha, whilst the other countries remain still far below 500 kg/ha. The processing industry is growing, yet there is a huge need for intensified supply chain linkages, as successfully started with the Matching Fund projects.


Based on these kind of evaluations and a review of achievements, new focal areas and activities to be implemented in 2014 were defined.


This is the basis for a draft annual operational plan for all components, yet to be refined for each country of operations.


Over a period of one week the team met together with a representative of the Ministry of Agriculture of Burkina Faso and a partnering GIZ project on agricultural development Programme développement d'agriculture (PDA).


The topics of discussion and endorsement were focused on the four project components: Production, Processing, Supply Chain linkages and Sector Organization, as well as Monitoring and Evaluation (M&E) and Management/ Communication. Furthermore, contents for the second Master Training Program session to be held in Cote d’ivoire, in the first half of 2014, from the 7.04. – 11.04.2014 were discussed.


After a fruitful planning week, we are looking forward to a new cashew season 2014, to jointly tackle the challenges and equally important to celebrate the success of a growing cashew industry in West Africa.



Contract Farming Handbook 05.02.2014

Contract Farming Handbook

A practical guide for linking small-scale producers and buyers through business model innovation


This handbook provides a practical and process-oriented approach guiding practitioners through sound planning, starting up, consolidation and up-scaling of contract farming (CF) schemes. It gives insights in the selection of an appropriate business model for the farm supply-firm procurement interface based on principles of fairness and transparency. It furthermore provides guiding principles, questions and answers for the development of viable CF business and practicable management plans, mutually beneficial farming contracts and mutually agreed dispute settlement systems. Following a concise introduction into the theory of contract farming, the handbook also gives hints for facilitators interested to support CF development in the form of moderation, technical and financial assistance respectively.


Please download the handbook here: http://www.africancashewinitiative.org/index.php?lang=eng&page=39&cid=2


Published by GIZ on behalf of the Federal Ministry for Economic Cooperation and Development (BMZ): Sector Project Agricultural Policy and Food Security, Agricultural Input Supply Project (AISP) Zimbabwe, Competitive African Cotton Initiative (COMPACI)


Author: Margret Will, June 2013


With contributions from: Max Baumann, Christoph Pannhausen, Till Rockenbauch and Ulrich Weyl



On a Personal Note with Kwabena Taylor 17.01.2014

On a Personal Note with Kwabena Taylor

In an interview with ACi/GiZ, Kwabena Taylor talks about his life as a cashew processor in Ghana.


Cashew nuts have tremendous market potential that everyone should benefit from. To be successful and organise his business in a way that will benefit as many people as possible – that’s what Kwabena Taylor, who manages a cashew processing company in Ghana, wants.


What role does Ghana play in your life?
I travelled a lot in my youth. I lived in the USA and visited Europe. I always thought the ‘grass was greener on the other side.’ But it isn’t – and I soon came back. Ghana offers so many opportunities; I love the country and the people. When my brother showed me this piece of land, I immediately began to make plans.


Why cashews? Why did you decide to go for this line of business?
Cashews are in demand the world over and the market is growing. In days gone by, African countries used to export their raw cashew nuts and so forego the substantial income that can be generated by processing them. Nowadays there is more and more local processing going on. We pay our farmers fair prices, help them improve the quality of their nuts and create jobs – especially for women.


Which challenges did you have to surmount in order to set up the factory?
In Ghana it is difficult to get funding for agriculture. We had just got together enough money when we realised that the raw products the local farmers were offering us were not up to standard. Luckily we have good international partners that advise us well on all these challenges.


What is the most important thing in your life?
First and foremost I am a business man. I want to be successful and earn money. But I also feel very responsible towards my workers. If I had to close the factory they would all lose their jobs. Often an entire family is dependent on this income. For this reason, the most important thing is that as many people as possible benefit from my company.


What would you do if you won the lottery?
I would finance the vocational training of promising young men and women – education is the most valuable commodity there is. And I would put money into environmental protection projects: I would like to see a greener world. But I would still go to work in my factory every day and I would continue to invest money in cashew processing in Ghana.



IDH and ACi sign MoU 16.01.2014

IDH and ACi sign MoU

A two year cooperation agreement for the 2nd Call of Applications for the Cashew Matching Fund was signed this week.


After intensive negotiations, ACi and IDH - The Sustainable Trade Initiative decided to cooperate closer. IDH officially became funding partner to the ACi Matching Fund Projects with a special component on Supply Chain Management Information Systems. Both partners are looking forward to support sustainable projects on African Cashew.
The Sustainable Trade Initiative, based in the Netherlands, accelerates and up-scales sustainable trade by building impact oriented coalitions of front running multinationals, civil society organizations, governments and other stakeholders. Through convening public and private interests, strengths and knowledge, IDH programs help create shared value for all partners. Since March 2012 IDH has been involved in the African Cashew sector. Their aim is to create sustainable economic growth, private sector development and economic empowerment.



A Letter of Appreciation from the Minister of Agriculture in Côte d’Ivoire 29.11.2013

A Letter of Appreciation from the Minister of Agriculture in Côte d’Ivoire

Mr. Mamadou Sangafowa Coulibaly expresses his gratitude to ACi Executive Director, Rita Weidinger, for training Ivorian cashew farmers to meet international quality standards and improving the productivity of their cashew trees.


ACi’s long-term goals of promoting African cashews and a sustainable reduction in poverty are in line with the government’s objective to improve farmer income by strengthening their position in the cashew value chain, writes Mr. Mamadou Sangafowa Coulibaly, the Ivorian Minister of Agriculture.


Since the strategic reforms in March 2013, the Ivorian government has been committed to building up the national cashew sector. In October 2013, ARECA and ACi signed a cooperation agreement to jointly promote the development the cashew sector in Côte d’Ivoire. The Minister of Agriculture, in his letter of appreciation, encourages ACi and ARECA to work hand in hand on the road to a flourishing cashew sector.


 



Audio postcard: An interview with cashew farmer Adu Agi Trun 11.11.2013

Audio postcard: An interview with cashew farmer Adu Agi Trun

In July 2013, ACi together with the Ministry of Food and Agriculture and Farm Radio international interviewed Ghanaian cashew farmers on their opinion a joint radio program.


Adu Agi Trun is a cashew farmer at Amomaso in the Brekum district. He started cashew farming almost 20 years ago. Mr Trun usually harvests only a few bags on his small farm. After receiving technical advice from the Ministry of Food and Agriculture, he used improved planting material and applied good agricultural practices. The result is astonishing with up to 25 bags on the same farm.


From January to June, ten radio shows on topics along the cashew value chain were broadcasted in the Brong Ahafo Region. BAR FM and Royal FM are the two radio stations committed to support farmers in the area. Farmers in six cashew growing communities reported individually and in groups. The Cashew Radio Hour gave them a feeling of belonging and to be 'real cashew farmers'. Listening to cashew experts convinced them to apply the recommended practices. It not only increased cashew quality but also their annual income.


Listen to Adu Agi Trun here



CCA replaces ACRECA as the new regulatory body for cashew and cotton. 07.11.2013

CCA replaces ACRECA as the new regulatory body for cashew and cotton.

In September 2013, the government of Côte d`Ivoire revised its regulatory organization ARECA transforming it into a board structure: The Cotton and Cashew Council (Conseil Coton et Anacarde/CCA) with representation of public and private actors.


The CCA - Cashew and Cotton Council - has been created to regulate, monitor and develop activities in the cotton and cashew sector. Former ARECA Executive Director Mr. Malamine Sanogo was nominated by the President of Côte d`Ivoire as Director General of the CCA. The African Cashew initiative (ACi) was working hand in hand with ARECA during the transformation process leading to the CCA. ACi activities are in line with the national strategic priorities for the cashew sector which are building technical expertise in optimizing production, improving raw cashew nut quality, increasing value- added processing and linking actors along the cashew value chain.


 


 



Transparent trading with smartphone technology 07.11.2013

Transparent trading with smartphone technology

The smartphone-based Virtual Cooperative software, developed with farmers in Ghana and Burkina Faso, is supporting transparent and efficient trade in cashew and shea nuts, to the advantage of both sellers and buyers.


For many smallholder farmers, selling their cashew crop has been transformed in recent years, thanks to the application of some state-of-the-art business technology. Developed and tested in Ghana, Burkina Faso and Uganda since 2010, the Virtual Cooperatives software allows groups of cashew, shea nut and coffee producers to carry out a range of ‘high volume’ transactions using applications on smartphones. Advanced systems used by both sellers and buyers for tagging, tracing and selling agricultural produce are among the most important. Though the prototypical software is still in the pilot phase, genuine transactions between participating farmers and traders have been undertaken covering over 13 cropping seasons in seven sites, with more than 12.000 producers already registered on the system.


The system, developed by business software company SAP in partnership with Deutsche Gesellschaft für Internationale Zusammenarbeit (GIZ) and the African Cashew initiative (ACi), electronically tracks sales of crops by assigning barcoded sacks to each smallholder in the cooperative. Every sack of nuts the group intends to trade is then scanned by buying agents with their smartphone. They also type the weight of the sack into the smartphone app in order to calculate the price, based on recent market data. Once the sale is made, the farmer immediately receives a digital receipt of the transaction and it is electronically recorded in the cooperative's books.


Software development


The technology was developed utilizing advanced research methodologies, which aim to apply a holistic approach to business and technology. Close and regular interaction with end users is central to the method and crucial for success. For example participatory workshops were organised with cooperative members in order to explore their challenges for cashew sales and logistics, design user-friendly screens, and develop the functionality of the software applications.
The first pilots were carried out during Ghana’s cashew season between March and June 2011, during which around 400 farmers were registered and more than 100 tons of raw cashews were traded. SAP supported the implementation by supplying the necessary equipment (smartphones and barcode stickers, etc,) – training activities, regular communication with all the local stakeholders and deploying the custom-built application.


Boosting efficiency


The Virtual Cooperative system has helped farmers improve their organizational efficiency, ensure transparency of business operations and run detailed data analysis. Ultimately the system helps farmers to more easily access profitable markets. Meanwhile buyers, including local processors, have been able to plan and forecast their trading more accurately which enables in the long term reliable and trusted business relationships to farmers. The system has also enabled them to buy from smallholder producers who have previously been largely excluded from formal trading systems. In future, even consumers may benefit from the system and be able to learn the precise origin of their cashew or shea nuts simply by scanning a barcoded package at the retailer.


As of September 2013, the Virtual Cooperative software has been used in three countries, utilizing different language versions. By end of 2013 more than 20,000 producers will be registered in the system which will then support the trading of four different crops in West and East Africa. Coffee cooperatives in Uganda and cocoa farmers in Cote d’Ivoire are set to be among those to test the technology.


Commercial future


Additional functions are currently under development, including supply of farm inputs and services, extended quality indicators for produce, pre-finance and electronic payments, and advanced geographical information tools to aid in crop selection. The system is designed to allow data sharing between producer groups and organisations higher up the value chain, including processors, exporters, certifiers and retailers.


SAP aims to develop a matured, market ready product which can be incorporated into commercial farm businesses that is also accessible and affordable to farmer groups at the bottom of the economic pyramid.



Global food safety and improved nutrition: A dialogue 22.08.2013

Global food safety and improved nutrition: A dialogue

More than 30 public and private sector actors followed an invitation by the German Food Partnership (GFP) to discuss joint operations in developing countries.


With a steady increase in world population, businesses and politics have to deal with a growing demand for quality food and a stable supply of nutrition. This development calls for increased efficiency in production and process optimization along value chains. In the scope of the German Food partnership, representatives from the civil society (e.g. Welthungerhilfe, Oxfam) and the private sector (e.g. Bayer CropScience) exchanged opinions on how entrepreneurial interest can positively affect development impacts and shared experiences on what necessitates successful multilateral operation and change.


Rita Weidinger, Executive Director of the African Cashew initiative (ACi) was invited to give an expert impulse on potentials and challenges private and public actors face when forming strategic alliances in the case of the West African Cashew Sector. The African Cashew Initiative shares the overall objective with the German Food Partnership of ‘creating an efficient value chain that promotes economic and societal values in equal measures’.


Learn more on German Food Partnership (German only)



Major challenges are best tackled in partnership 22.08.2013

Major challenges are best tackled in partnership

Partnerships between private sector and state foster sustainable development


The German Federal Ministry for Economic Cooperation and Development (BMZ) launched develoPPP.de – a programme to foster cooperation between the private sector and development policy for the mutual benefit of both parties.


Learn more on develoPPP.de



Jack Klijn - Is nuts 22.08.2013

Jack Klijn - Is nuts


A new nut brand has been introduced to the Dutch supermarkets, since the end of April. Intersnack, one of the committed private sector partners of ACi, re-launched its trademark Jack Klijn. Five nuts: cashew, almond, macadamia, peanuts and walnuts received the Rainforest Alliance or Fair-trade sustainability certification on quality nut standards. More than 20.000 farmers in 9 countries were trained on better nut production and international standards for specialty markets, supplying high quality nuts, benefitting from fair and guaranteed prizes.

In ACi’s first four years of intervention, FairMatch Support organized African cashew farmers into cooperatives, certified and linked them to specialty markets. In 2010 implementations by TDG and Intersnack bore its first fruits when Albert Heijn, the largest supermarket chain in the Netherland, introduced a private brand of Fair-Trade cashew kernels. Shortly after, in the beginning of 2013, Fair Trade cashews also hit the German supermarket chain Lidl. The launch of Jack Klijn nuts is yet another step forward in promoting sustainable cashew and other nuts within Europe.

After four years of dedicated work in preparing all actors in the cashew value chain, results are visible on local and international markets. High quality nuts are available, local processing is increasing and global demand is growing. However, a young sector can only mature as long as all actors along the value chain are profiting.
ACi, in its second intervention phase is taking innovative measures towards mainstreaming sustainability. Intersnack, TDG and Olam, in co-operation with IDH Sustainable Trade Initiative and FairMatch Support as an ACi implementing partner, developed a framework to promote sustainable cashew production in the sector. Also other private companies and public organizations are invited to join ACi in its innovative approach to create a sustainable African cashew sector.


 



Cashews from Burkina Faso 22.08.2013

Cashews from Burkina Faso

Gebana Incorporation starts buying


The African Cashew initiative (ACi) gave a helping hand when the Swiss Gebana Incorporation (AG) and Gebana Afrique investigated Burkina Faso’s cashew market. When the Gebana finally started it’s farmer's linkage project in Burkina Faso ACi Executive Director Rita Weidinger expressed her gratitude and hope: “The objective of the project is to increase the income of small-holder cashew farmers in this West African country. I’m very sure that we can achieve this goal - with the investment and enthusiasm from Gebana’s side.”


Currently representatives of Gebana from Switzerland are visiting the production zones and processing facilities in Burkina Faso. As the harvesting season has just started, they are using the time to mobilize farmers to improve the quality of the raw cashew nuts (RCN). Gebana will give selected farmers the chance to link to high end markets, like the organic and the Fair Trade market in Switzerland. Quality is the major criteria for these markets. Apart from the quality, new innovative marketing strategies will play an important role in this project. 


For more information on Gebana and Cashew farmers in Burkina Faso, please click here.



Tasty cashews from Africa storm LIDL shelves in Europe 22.08.2013

Tasty cashews from Africa storm LIDL shelves in Europe

Supermarket chain sells Fairtrade cashew kernels from ACi countries


It is a massive success for the African Cashew initiative (ACi) as cashew kernels produced in its project countries in West- and East-Africa will soon be available in LIDL shelves across Germany. An ACi colleague living and working in Germany says: “This is all what we have been working for: I go to the supermarket here in Germany and can buy a product from our cashew farmers in Africa”.  


In 2009 ACi started to link various farmers’ organizations to high end markets in Europe and US America. Many of the supported groups obtained FairTade certification. Since 2010, the certified organizations have been delivering their product to a Dutch retailer. Following that same channel, the kernels are now also satisfying the snack needs of LIDL customers. The supermarket chain holds a Fair Trade brand called Fairglobe. The African cashew are sold under this flag.


The African farmers are selling their cashew nuts at a guaranteed price and receive an interesting premium. In ACi's five project countries, FairMatch Support - a Dutch NGO – is supporting the farmers and linking them to international buyers.



Beyond certification 22.08.2013

Beyond certification

The Dutch Herman uit de Bosch, founder and director of FairMatch Support reflects


Herman uit de Bosch proposes 'out of the box thinking': Organic and Fairtrade certification systems are expensive and the markets turn from “Buyers’ markets” to “Sellers’ markets” when the product is so valuable that the seller can choose to which buyer he/she wants to sell.


Read uit de Bosch’s blog on the FairMatch Support webpage and join in reflecting: ”Are certification systems set up in a buyers’ market suitable to address needs and opportunities in a sellers’ market?” 



Italy and Africa: MoU connects cashew world 22.08.2013

Italy and Africa: MoU connects cashew world

Oltremare and the African Cashew initiative (ACi) strengthen their cooperation


During the ACA Annual Conference in The Gambia, on September 21st, 2011, the Italian equipment supplier Oltremare in person of Managing Director Stefano Massari and ACi’s Executive Director Rita Weidinger signed a Memorandum of Understanding. The paper defines Oltremare’s commitment to the ACi. Formally Oltremare’s active contributions entitle the company as a “Core Partner” of ACi.


Oltremare has been supporting ACi since the beginning of the project in a non-formal way. The MoU brings the cooperation to a new stage of intensity which will support the development of a sustainable African cashew sector.



G & G - Gates meets GIZ 22.08.2013

G & G - Gates meets GIZ

One of the richest men of the world expresses his interest in further cooperation



Bill Gates, founder of the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation and major funder of the ACi project, met representatives of the Deutsche Gesellschaft für Internationale Zusammenarbeit (GIZ) during his visit in Berlin on February 6th, 2013. Together with Spokeswoman of the Board Tanja Gönner, Gates reflected on the past joint projects and discussed potential future cooperation. Currently, the foundation supports nine GIZ projects in 13 developing countries in Africa aiming at improving people’s health and fighting hunger and poverty. “I’m a business man, I do not waste money. That is why my interest always lies here: Where and in which topic our money has the highest impact” stated Gates already before his meeting with GIZ representatives. Gates mentioned ACi among the projects with great impact, contributing to a sustainable poverty reduction in the five project countries.




40 Years of the Future 22.08.2013

40 Years of the Future

The African Cashew initiative (ACi) joins SAP in celebrating


SAP celebrates. In January 2013 the company became 40 years old. On the occasion of this anniversary a large exhibition was opened. It takes visitors into the past, the present and the future – with pictures, video clips as well as interactive digital spots and features. The exhibition shows how interwoven the history of SAP and the technical development everywhere in the world is. ACi Executive Director, Rita Weidinger, took the opportunity to participate with a short video clip. She followed the exhibitions concept and answered the question of a little girl in her statement. As the child asked: "Where do all the great things in the supermarket come from?" she explained about the long way a cashew has to travel until reaching the shelves of a supermarket.


To view this feature, please click here



ACi joins the New Alliance for Food and Nutrition Security 22.08.2013

ACi joins the New Alliance for Food and Nutrition Security

ACi and partners sign G8 letter of intent


On 18th May 2012, in an announcement ahead of the G-8 summit at Camp David, it was revealed that African leaders and the G-8 leaders will commit to the New Alliance for Food and Nutrition Security. The Alliance is the next phase of their commitment to attaining food security all across the world. The New Alliance for Food Nutrition Security is designed with the aim of accelerating the flow of private capital to African agriculture, bringing not only new technologies to Africa but also various innovations which have the potential to help boost the productivity of millions of African farmers and alleviate poverty over the next 10 years. The New Alliance for Food and Nutrition Security is expected to increase average agriculture sector growth rates by 1.5 per cent per year over 10 years across sub-Saharan Africa.


The African Cashew Initiative (ACi) is proud to announce that its partners Intersnack Group GmbH & Co. KG, Kraft FoodsInc., Olam International, SAP AG, Trade and Development Group and Oltremare, have expressed support to the Grow Africa Initiative which is an African lead patnership platformand contributes to the New Alliance for Food and Nutrition Security in Sub‐Saharan Africa. Over the next few years, ACi and Deutsche Gesellschaft für Internationale Zusammenarbeit (GIZ) intend to explore partnerships and collaboration with the respective governments, donors and other partners to progress a set of investments. All parties recognize that achieving transformational and sustainable economic growth and impacting smallholder livelihoods require attracting significant and socially responsible private investments. This aligns well with the goals of Grow Africa Initiative as well as those of the New Alliance for Food and Nutrition Security. The project is consistent with the investment priorities identified by the country‐led Comprehensive Africa Agriculture Development Programme (CAADP) investment plans. All five of ACi’s project countries, Benin, Burkina Faso, Ghana, Ivory Coast and Mozambique stand to gain from contributions which will be made by the project to their national targets of increasing agricultural productivity. In effect, the development of the cashew industry in each of these countries will be accelerated.


 ACi is proud to have already made successful contributions to sustainable development.  In its first two years more than 240,000 individual farmers have been trained, meaning more than 1.9 million members of rural households have been reached by ACi. In 2011 alone the trained farmers realized $20 million annual additional family labour income through applying Good Agricultural Practices that result in higher yields. In addition, income from cashews drastically reduces the hungry season gap for many smallholder families. Regarding value addition in Africa, thirteen small to medium scale new cashew processing units are fully functional with technical assistance from the project. Thus far in the project period, they have delivered 3,000 metric tons of cashew kernels worth $29 million to European and US markets. These companies employ more than 3,100 workers, 74% of whom are women. Seven additional factories will be operational in 2012. The installed capacity for ACi‐assisted processing is 29,000 MT raw cashew nuts which become fully exportable products.



The only fund for cashews worldwide 22.08.2013

The only fund for cashews worldwide

The African Cashew initiative (ACi) launches Cashew Matching Fund


The African Cashew Initiative (ACi) has launched a Cashew Matching Fund designed to help accelerate the development of the cashew industry in its five project countries Ghana, Benin, Burkina Faso, Cote d’Ivoire and Mozambique. 


The fund will allow more private sector partners such as retailers, buyers, processors, farmer groups and public research organizations, to design and implement projects on farmer linkages and improved planting material. The Matching Fund supported projects must ultimately benefit farm productivity and farmers' income.


The main objective of the fund is to facilitate the achievement of improved quality and quantity of cashew produced, enhanced knowledge transfer to cashew farmers, strong linkages and ties between processors and/or buyers and farmers, improved access to price and production information as well as improved cashew value and supply chain for more and ultimate sustainability. 


For further information or to inquire about the fund please contact: cashewfund@giz.de.



ACi training material on FAO platform 22.08.2013

ACi training material on FAO platform

Cooperation ensures widespread usage of cashew publications


As part of its drive to sustainably disseminate information and knowledge regarding cashew production in Africa, the Deutsche Gesellschaft für Internationale Zusammenarbeit (GIZ), lead agency of the African Cashew initiative (ACi), have partnered with the Food and Agricultural Organization of the United Nations (FAO).


The FAO’s “Technologies and Practices for Small Agricultural Producers” Knowledge Sharing Platform (TECA) is an avenue through which different partner organizations, ranging from national, regional and international research organizations, to advisory services, universities, NGOs, development agencies and producer organizations provide agricultural technologies and practices. 


Available in English, French and Spanish, TECA is multilingual and aims to facilitate the documenting and sharing of practical agricultural information targeting small producers and extension agents across the world. 


This partnership between GIZ and FAO allows ACi to publish its extension material on the TECA website and so gives a wider audience access to valuable information about cashew production, whilst it facilitates a capacity building beyond ACi’s intervention zones. Training and extension material developed with ACi’s support is already available on the platform and will be continuously updated. 


Training documents are also to be found in the Download section (Media coverage).    


Please visit here to access the platform: http://teca.fao.org/home



Mobile Phones for African Farmers 22.08.2013

Mobile Phones for African Farmers

Event brings to light the opportunities new technologies carry


On May 15th the mAGRIC Showcase 2012 took place in Accra. mAGRIC is an event organized by Esoko, a company offering technology platforms and consultancy services. The event 2012 was co-sponsored by Deutsche Gesellschaft für Internationale Zusammenarbeit (GIZ), Ministry of Food and Agriculture Ghana (MOFA) and the World Bank. It brought together practitioners, researchers, development partners, mobile operators as well as agribusiness and government personnel to explore the role of mobile phones in developing agriculture. Six organizations experienced in mobile phone technology showcased their innovative programs as part of the event. Among these, was the African Cashew initiative (ACi) who presented its insights in using mobile phones as a complementary instrument for farmer training and managing farmer based organizations. 


Participants also debated the use of different mobile phone services and how information can best be placed in context to be understood and applied. Another point of discussion was the ownership of mobile phone technology and business models. A moderator summarized the main question as follows: “Should mobile services be a public good and free of charge for users, or should they belong to private operators which require users to pay a subscription fee?”


The overall observation of the event was for all participants: The main challenge that many programs face today is the gap between technically feasible options and technical fluency of the rural population. In the end, not one system fits all but rather a combination of various technologies results in the desired outcome of sharing knowledge, giving advice and the promotion of improved production technologies for improving agricultural production and value chains.



And the winner is… 22.08.2013

And the winner is…

The African Cashew initiative (ACi) in Ghana is amongst the first in GIZ gender competition 2012


During the first week of March the Deutsche Gesellschaft für Internationale Zusammenarbeit (GIZ), implementing partner of the African Cashew initiative (ACi), organized its yearly gender week. The highlight of this event was an organization-wide gender competition. Overall, 53 GIZ projects participated in the contest and 23 Africa-wide applications were submitted. ACi was ranked 2nd to the overall winners from Uganda.

The gender team presented its findings from a recently conducted qualitative gender survey in the two project countries Ghana and Burkina Faso. Research results highlighted ACi’s contributions to gender equality and women’s empowerment in the African cashew value chain, especially the empowering character of trainings in good agricultural practices, women’s participation in farmer-based organisations and the transformation of women’s lives by gaining their own source of income from working in cashew processing factories. ACi’s gender team, consisting of Kai Pohlmann, GIZ intern, Kofi Agyarko Mintah, the Monitoring and Evaluation officer, and Karon Reinhold, Junior Technical Officer, have been awarded by Ghana's Country Director Siegfried Leffler, who emphasised the significance of gender as an important cross-cutting issue in all GIZ interventions.


ACi's contribution to the gender competition can be accessed here



First international press trip in ACi conducted 22.08.2013

First international press trip in ACi conducted

10 journalists from all over the world visit project activities in Ghana


In September 2011 the African Cashew initiative (ACi) was visited by a group of ten international correspondents and reporters of several well-respected international print and online media houses. The press trip was logistically supported by SAP and ACi and resulted in the strong interest and demand for information on the project from media circles. During the one week trip to Accra and the cashew producing regions in the North of Ghana the journalists gained insight into the colourful world of cashew production and processing in West Africa.

One of the main points of interest involves the cooperation between the Deutsche Gesellschaft für Internationale Zusammenarbeit (GIZ) and SAP, one of the leading German / international software companies. In the activities of this pilot project, Ghanaian cashew farmers use smartphone applications to scan filled sacks and therefore have better control over the production and delivery of the cashew nut which is resulting in an improved bargaining position and increased income.


The trip resulted in various articles to be found in the Download section (Media coverage).



Beyond the farm 22.08.2013

Beyond the farm

Promoting agribusiness as a way out of poverty


Increasing farm yields alone is not enough to lift families and communities out of poverty. Simon Winter, Vice President of ACi’s implementing partner, TechnoServe, in an article on the development of the cashew sector in Mozambique elaborates on other factors and systems that need to be changed so that small-holder farmers in Africa can improve their living standards efficiently. The African Cashew initiative (ACi) feels its decision to not only focus on trainings for farmers but also on establishing components like Supply Chain Linkages and Cashew Sector Organization is appreciated.


Find the article in "The Guardian" here.



New radio campaigns for cashew farmers 22.08.2013

New radio campaigns for cashew farmers

ACi collaborates with Farm Radio International in preparing a new campaign


During a three day workshop in March 2012 in Sunyani the teams of the African Cashew initiative (ACi) and the Farm Radio International designed sat together to discuss about the future cooperation. A 12-month participatory radio campaign themed, " Designing Participatory Radio Campaigns" was developed. The planning was based on a previously conducted field study among cashew farmers in the Brong Ahafo region in Ghana.


The strength of rural radio lies in its ability to function as an extension tool, providing cashew farmers with information on when and how to apply recommended Good Agricultural Practices as well as harvest and post-harvest methods. Farm Radio International, a Canadian NGO, specialized in the development of radio campaigns and radio script writing facilitated this workshop. Participants included representatives and experts from the Market Oriented Agricultural Program (MOAP), the Ministry of Food and Agriculture (MOFA), the Grameen Foundation as well as the two local radio stations BAR Radio Sunyani and Wenchi Royal FM.



New technologies enhance farmer unions’ members 22.08.2013

New technologies enhance farmer unions’ members

With SMS Text Messages and ICT applications farmers will have more services


It is all about transferring knowledge. Within the framework of the African Cashew initiative (ACi) 20,000 cashew farmers in Ghana received training on good agricultural practices during interactive sessions. Picture material stimulates discussion and learning. But how to make sure that more farmers receive this knowledge, that they are reminded of what they have learned? The Wenchi Farmer Union currently tests the use of SMS texts sent to member farmers containing key messages taken from the trainings. The currently used software is FrontlineSMS and it is intended to integrate the whole service into the SAP based software on price and weighing information for automated sending and replies as well as monitoring. ACi’s trainings are complemented by practical demonstrations and radio broadcasts. Modules covered are: Installation of plantations, management of cashew plantations including “Good Agricultural Practices”, harvest, post-harvest and quality aspects of raw cashew nuts and phytosanitary information. With the help of the new technologies, ACi hopes that the farmer unions will support the transfer of knowledge to new and more farmers as well as remind those who have participated in trainings of what they have previously learnt. More information is summarized in a paper which was presented at the International Conference on Innovations in Extension and Advisory Services: Linking Knowledge to Policy and Action for Food and Livelihoods in Nairobi, Kenya in November 2011.


Please click here for further information.



Trainings bring better harvest and more money 22.08.2013

Trainings bring better harvest and more money

Cashew Farmer from Benin benefit from ACi’s work


In November 2011, the African Cashew initiative (ACi) conducted a research among cashew farmers from Benin to examine success factors of ACi farmer trainings. Through this, a very successful farmer emerged as a role model for African cashew farming and shows how ACi farmer trainings contribute to an increased and stable source of income.


Please read more here